Solving a Physics 30 Question: Car & Truck Collision

In summary, the conversation discusses a physics problem involving a car and truck colliding at an intersection. The question is about finding the initial common velocity of the car and truck after the collision, assuming it is an inelastic collision. The conversation also mentions the importance of conservation of momentum and the fact that inelastic collisions do not affect it.
  • #1
sadaf.10
2
0
hi i am doing physics 30 by modules after doing it by class. and i am having a hard time working this question out.

A car with a mass of 1400kg is westbound at 50km/h. it collides at an intersection with a northbound truck having a mass of 2000kg and traveling at 40km/h. what is the inital common velocity of the car and truck immediatley after the collision if they have an inelastic collision?

i did all my conversions but i just can't figure out the proper steps in receiving the answer.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Momentum should be conservered along both the x and y axes. Write some eqns to express the momenta before and after the collision--the mass of the car/truck is just the sum of the two individually.
 
  • #3
so i don't really have to worry about the inelastic collision.
because i was stuck on that part.
just go along with finding the inital momentum and final and go from there?
 
  • #4
Inelastic collisions only effect the conservation of kinetic energy, not momentum.
 
  • #5
sadaf.10 said:
just go along with finding the inital momentum and final and go from there?
Yes.
 

Related to Solving a Physics 30 Question: Car & Truck Collision

1. How do you calculate the final velocity of the car after the collision?

The final velocity of the car can be calculated using the equation: vf = (m1v1 + m2v2) / (m1 + m2), where m1 and v1 are the mass and initial velocity of the car, and m2 and v2 are the mass and initial velocity of the truck.

2. What factors influence the outcome of a car and truck collision?

The outcome of a car and truck collision is influenced by factors such as the mass and velocity of the vehicles, the angle of impact, and the type of collision (e.g. head-on, rear-end, etc.). Other factors such as the condition of the vehicles, road conditions, and the use of safety features can also impact the outcome.

3. How does the conservation of momentum apply to a car and truck collision?

The law of conservation of momentum states that the total momentum of a closed system remains constant. In a car and truck collision, the total momentum of the system before the collision is equal to the total momentum after the collision, as long as there are no external forces acting on the system. This means that the sum of the momenta of the car and truck before the collision is equal to the sum of their momenta after the collision.

4. Can you determine the force of impact in a car and truck collision?

The force of impact in a car and truck collision can be determined using the equation: F = m(vf - vi) / t, where m is the mass of the vehicle, vf is the final velocity after the collision, vi is the initial velocity before the collision, and t is the time it takes for the vehicles to come to a complete stop. However, it is important to note that this calculation may not accurately represent the actual force experienced by the occupants of the vehicles, as it does not take into account the crumple zones and other safety features of modern cars.

5. How does the coefficient of restitution affect the outcome of a car and truck collision?

The coefficient of restitution is a measure of the elasticity of a collision. In a car and truck collision, a higher coefficient of restitution means that the vehicles will bounce off each other with less energy lost, resulting in a more severe collision. On the other hand, a lower coefficient of restitution means that more energy is absorbed during the collision, resulting in a less severe outcome. This coefficient is dependent on factors such as the materials and design of the vehicles, as well as the angle and velocity of the collision.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
29
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
Back
Top