Solving Fridge Water Line Leaks - Tips & Advice

In summary, the conversation discusses the issue of a slow drip from a disconnected copper line that used to supply water to an old fridge. The suggestion is made to replace the valve, as it may have mineral deposits causing it to not close completely. The individual mentions using JB weld as a temporary fix and planning to replace the valve when they are ready to install the new fridge. Other suggestions include crimping the copper tubing and replacing it later, or just crimping it until the new fridge is installed. The conversation also briefly touches on the necessity of a water pipe for fridges that have a cooled water supply.
  • #1
electrical_ck
8
0
I just bought a new fridge and sold my previous fridge, so I disconnected the copper line to the old fridge. I turned the valve to the fridge line off but there still is a slow drip. I haven't connected it to the new fridge yet since we are putting new cabinets and placing the fridge in a new position. Somebody told me that you could use vise grips to close the copper line that went to the fridge, or do I have to get a fitting to stop this leak.
 
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  • #2
If you're getting a slow drip with the valve closed, replace the valve. It has probably gotten mineral deposits on it over time and doesn't close completely. While you have everything apart anyway, it's a good and easy time to replace the valve in case you ever do have a bigger leak and NEED to close it completely to work on it.
 
  • #3
Moonbear said:
If you're getting a slow drip with the valve closed, replace the valve. It has probably gotten mineral deposits on it over time and doesn't close completely. While you have everything apart anyway, it's a good and easy time to replace the valve in case you ever do have a bigger leak and NEED to close it completely to work on it.

yeah it is coated with mineral deposits, I am going to the store right now to place jb weld on it for a temp fix. We are ripping out all of cabinets so I will place the new valve than.
 
  • #4
Ask yourself what avoiding a flood is worth to you, then cap it off properly until you're ready to plumb in the new appliance.
 
  • #5
It's just a piece of copper tubing. I would crimp it shut then replace it later.
 
  • #6
dlgoff said:
It's just a piece of copper tubing. I would crimp it shut then replace it later.
If it's just dripping, I wouldn't even bother replacing the valve - just crimp the tube until installing the new fridge!

A leaky valve can't cause a flood.
 
  • #7
You will be needing a new flex water line and shut off valve anyway. Just crimp the old line and wait.
 
  • #8
get a bigger hammer!
 
  • #9
I crimped it, no leaks
 
  • #10
Since when do fridges need a water pipe?!
 
  • #11
Blenton said:
Since when do fridges need a water pipe?!

Since they had a cooled water supply.
 

Related to Solving Fridge Water Line Leaks - Tips & Advice

1. How do I know if my fridge water line is leaking?

If you notice water pooling around your refrigerator, or if you see a decrease in water pressure or flow from your water dispenser, these are telltale signs of a leak in your fridge water line.

2. What are some common causes of fridge water line leaks?

The most common causes of fridge water line leaks include a damaged or worn out water line, loose connections, or a malfunctioning water inlet valve.

3. Can I fix a fridge water line leak myself?

In some cases, you may be able to fix a fridge water line leak yourself. However, it is important to proceed with caution and make sure you have the proper tools and knowledge before attempting any repairs. If you are unsure, it is best to hire a professional plumber or appliance repair technician.

4. How can I prevent fridge water line leaks?

Regularly inspecting your fridge water line for any signs of damage or wear, and promptly addressing any issues can help prevent leaks. It is also important to replace the water line every 5-7 years to prevent buildup and deterioration.

5. How often should I check my fridge water line for leaks?

It is recommended to check your fridge water line at least once a year for any signs of leaks. However, if you notice any changes in water pressure or flow, or see water pooling around your fridge, it is important to check for leaks immediately and address them as soon as possible.

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