Solving Physics Problem: Calculate Frictional Force of 24 N

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In summary, the net force acting on the system can be calculated by subtracting the friction force from the force causing the acceleration of the ball, which is 24 N. However, the weight of the 5 kg mass also has a component acting against the 24 N force. To fully solve the problem, more information is needed such as the angle of the plane, the direction of the force, and the mass of the object. Assuming the applied force is parallel to the inclined plane, the friction force can be calculated by subtracting the net force of 15 N (5 kg * 3 m/s^2) from the applied force of 24 N, resulting in a friction force of 9 N.
  • #1
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hi ,

1.A force of 24 N acts on a body causing its movement on an inclined plane with acceleration 3 m/s^2 . calculate the frictional force.



so can u illustrate the answer to me?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
You will need to provide more information to allow us to help with this.
What is the mass in kg? The angle of the plane? The direction of the force?
 
  • #3
You will need to provide more information to allow us to help with this.
What is the mass in kg? The angle of the plane? The direction of the force?

No , I just forgot to write the mass which is 5 Kg .This is the All of the Given information.
But for now i have a suggestion and all you have to do is to check w heather I'm right or not.

The net force acting on the system = The force causing the acceleration of the ball - Friction force
right??
well
Net force = 24 - Friction = (5*3)
Net force = 24 - Friction = 15
therefore friction force = 24 - 15 = 9 Newtons

Right??
Thanks in advance.
 
  • #4
Misr said:
No , I just forgot to write the mass which is 5 Kg .This is the All of the Given information.
But for now i have a suggestion and all you have to do is to check w heather I'm right or not.

The net force acting on the system = The force causing the acceleration of the ball - Friction force
right??
well
Net force = 24 - Friction = (5*3)
Net force = 24 - Friction = 15
therefore friction force = 24 - 15 = 9 Newtons

Right??
Thanks in advance.
That looks good, provided that the applied 24 N force acts parallel to the plane. Since the problem does not specify that, I guess you'll have to assume it.
 
  • #5
If the plane is inclined and the force acts parallel to it, the net force is not simply "24 - friction". The weight of the mass also has a component acting against the 24N.
 
  • #6
Stonebridge said:
If the plane is inclined and the force acts parallel to it, the net force is not simply "24 - friction". The weight of the mass also has a component acting against the 24N.
Indeed it does, my error:redface:
 

1. What is frictional force?

Frictional force is a force that opposes the motion of an object when it comes into contact with another object or surface.

2. How do you calculate the frictional force?

The frictional force can be calculated by multiplying the coefficient of friction (μ) by the normal force (N). In this case, the frictional force of 24 N can be calculated as μN = 24 N.

3. What is the normal force?

The normal force is the perpendicular force exerted by a surface on an object that is in contact with it. It is equal to the weight of the object in most cases.

4. How do you determine the coefficient of friction?

The coefficient of friction can be determined by conducting experiments and measuring the force required to move an object against a surface. It is a dimensionless quantity that varies depending on the materials and surfaces in contact.

5. What are some factors that affect the frictional force?

The frictional force can be affected by several factors such as the nature of the surfaces in contact, the force pressing the surfaces together, the smoothness of the surfaces, and the presence of lubricants.

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