Spring/Incline plane kinematics/work problem

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In summary, a .5 Kg block with a spring constant of K = 625 Newtons per meter is pressed back against a compressed spring by .1 meters. When released, the block travels up a frictionless incline at an angle of 30 degrees. By using the initial potential energy of the spring being converted to gravitational potential energy, the maximum distance the block travels up the incline can be calculated.
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1. A .5 Kg block rests on a horizontal fricionless surface. The block is pressed back against a spring having a constant of K =625 Newtons per meter. The spring is compressed .1 meters. Then the block is released. Find the maximum distance the block travels up the frictionless incline if the angle on the incline is 30 degrees.


2.



3. I set up the PE, KE, and spring .5kxsquared added up equal total energy. For hight, i used 0, where the only stored energy would be the spring(.5kxsquared), PE and Ke here is 0. Than I put H as it's max height(where it would stop on the incline). I don't know what H is though, and can't solve for V.
 
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this has nothing to do with kinetic energy, you can calculate the height through use of the initial and final potential energy.
 
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Shadowsol said:
1. A .5 Kg block rests on a horizontal fricionless surface. The block is pressed back against a spring having a constant of K =625 Newtons per meter. The spring is compressed .1 meters. Then the block is released. Find the maximum distance the block travels up the frictionless incline if the angle on the incline is 30 degrees.


You said the surface was horizontal right at the beginning...

As Oerg said, you can solve it by using the fact that the initial PE of the spring is entirely converted to grav PE.

Initial PE = (1/2)kx^2.

If the block travels a dist of d up the plane, and the vertical dist gained is h, then find the relation between d and h. I leave that to you.

Final PE = mgh.

Now you can find d.
 

1. What is a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem?

A spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem is a type of physics problem that involves the use of kinematic equations to analyze the motion of objects on a tilted surface, such as an incline plane. It also involves the use of Hooke's law to calculate the force exerted by a spring on an object.

2. What are the key equations used in solving a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem?

The key equations used in solving a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem include Newton's second law (F=ma), Hooke's law (F=-kx), and the kinematic equations for motion in one dimension (x = x0 + v0t + 1/2at2 and v = v0 + at).

3. How do you approach solving a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem?

To solve a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem, you should first draw a free-body diagram to identify all the forces acting on the object. Then, use Newton's second law and Hooke's law to write equations for the forces in the x and y directions. Next, use the kinematic equations to solve for the unknown variables, such as acceleration, velocity, and displacement. Finally, check your solution and make sure it makes logical sense.

4. How does the angle of the incline plane affect the motion of the object in a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem?

The angle of the incline plane affects the motion of the object in a spring/incline plane kinematics/work problem by changing the components of the force of gravity acting on the object. As the angle of the incline plane increases, the force of gravity acting parallel to the incline plane decreases, while the force of gravity acting perpendicular to the incline plane increases. This results in a change in the acceleration and velocity of the object.

5. What are some real-life applications of spring/incline plane kinematics/work problems?

Spring/incline plane kinematics/work problems have many real-life applications, including analyzing the motion of objects on a ramp or hill, such as a rollercoaster or a car driving up a hill. These problems also have applications in engineering, such as designing ramps or inclined planes for loading and unloading heavy objects, and in sports, such as calculating the trajectory of a ski jumper or a skateboarder on a half-pipe.

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