Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Star Trek into Darkness - Most Face Palming moments

  1. May 19, 2014 #1

    DHF

    User Avatar

    So My wife and I just got around to watching this last night and it was decent enough if you put your disbelief in cyrostasis but hey that's Strek Trek in general. That being said, and knowing there is no semblance of reality to the science, Of all the scenes that would have bothered me, it was the one where Kirk is the Warp Core trying to realign it....by drop kicking it. Yes the very precision engineered Matter/Antimatter reactor can be perfectly aligned by madly stomping on it. I suppose I took it a little personal as the day before I was at work trying to repair a CPU, one of the pins was bent and here I was with tweezers and a magnifying glass trying in realign the pin to no avail...then in walks this Jackaroo doing a Chuck Norris on the most sensitive component of an Anti Matter reactor.

    Ok I am taking a deep breath now.

    So that was the one that stuck out for me, At what point did your palm meet your face?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 19, 2014 #2
    American part, Russian part, isnt the same? They all made on Taiwan! :P
     
  4. May 19, 2014 #3
    I guess the part that annoyed me the most is when the Enterprise is free-falling to Earth, and the gravity inside is completely messed up and makes absolutely no sense. It was so ridiculous that it actually took me right out of the movie.
     
  5. May 21, 2014 #4

    Ryan_m_b

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    *Sigh, where to start! Two in particular come to mind: the fact that Khan teleported from one solar system to another and the characters are like "strange but no biggie" despite the fact that revolutionises their whole fleet of ships. The second is the Khan's blood can be injected into people to heal even death. Er...what? I could go on but these cover the many problems with the film quite well:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REOjxvQPQNQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6B22Uy7SBe4
     
  6. May 21, 2014 #5

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    As always, such nitpicking, completely valid though it is, totally misses the point that movie MAKERS not only don't care the least bit about scientific accuracy or internal logic, they have no reason to. This was probably best exemplified by Jame's Cameron's humorously sarcastic response to Neil Degrasse Tyson when Tyson complained that Cameron had gotten the sky wrong in Avatar. Carmeron said, Gee, Neil, last I heard the movie has grossed over a BILLION dollars worldwide. Just think how much it might have made if I had gotten the sky right.
     
  7. May 21, 2014 #6

    Ryan_m_b

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I don't think it misses the point, no one is disputing that this films make money, but there are examples of better fiction and by pointing out mistakes not only can we have an enjoyable conversation we can highlight mistakes that might make better work. That doesn't mean work that will make more money necessarily.
     
  8. May 21, 2014 #7

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Oh, it terms of pointing out mistakes, such as are discussed in this thread, I'm a nitpicker par excellance, to the point where my kids tell me that they are annoyed that my having instilled in them a similar nitpickery sometimes makes them cringe at stuff they would have otherwise just glossed over, which sometimes lessens their enjoyment of the movies.

    I agree w/ you that it would be nice if the movie makers would get it right AND make a compelling story but all of their focus is on the latter and none of us should expect that to change. It would be like expecting dogs not to pee on bushes.
     
  9. May 31, 2014 #8
    "Cameron's humorously sarcastic response to Neil Degrasse Tyson when Tyson complained that Cameron had gotten the sky wrong in Avatar."

    What was wrong with it?

    "I guess the part that annoyed me the most is when the Enterprise is free-falling to Earth, and the gravity inside is completely messed up and makes absolutely no sense. "

    Isnt it possible that it has entered the atmosphere, at it was because the air drag and turbulence?
     
  10. May 31, 2014 #9
    I don't think anyone expects filmmakers to make perfectly scientifically realistic movies. JJ Abrams is not a scientist. I think some people just find it fun to look for inaccuracies, in a totally harmless and good-natured way. I doubt Neil DeGrasse Tyson really thinks Avatar was rendered unwatchable by the sky issue, he was probably just using it as an opportunity to hilight a fun science fact.

    In answer to the original question, Khan's super-blood is THE WORST. It's not so much that it can bring back a dead person (we can do that too, with defibrillators), it's that it can bring back ANY dead person, who died from ANYTHING. I'm a nurse, so the medical errors are always what bug me. I literally can't watch any medical show on TV except reruns of Scrubs.

    That being said, I'll tell you what's NOT wrong with Start Trek Into Darkness: Benedict freakin' Cumberbatch. #yesplease
     
  11. May 31, 2014 #10

    Ryan_m_b

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It's not scientific realism people are necessarily looking for. Rather what most people want is for the physics that we do know to operate in the same manner unless otherwise specified and that speculative science and technology be consistent. Star Trek does neither of these. An example of the former is how the enterprise, despite being near the moon, falls to Earth in minutes when it's engines fail. For the latter khans blood and the transwarp beam break a lot of the setting because now every disease ever is cured and there's little need for star ships when you can beam to planets.

    That's pretty typical for the franchise as a whole. Every other episode in any of the series involves the crew inventing a miraculous technology whole cloth to fix a problem and despite the revolutionary implications of that technology it's never mentioned again nor is there ever a discussion of what else it could be used for.
     
  12. May 31, 2014 #11

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    You'd have to ask Tyson about that.
     
  13. May 31, 2014 #12

    Ryan_m_b

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    For starters it had rocks floating in it. As an aside GTOM please use the quote feature rathern than adding your own quote marks in future. It makes it much easier to track a conversation.
     
  14. Jun 1, 2014 #13
    Ok, that was a magic part, although that area had some kind of electromagnetic flux, if unobtanium is superconductor, couldnt that magnetic stuff repel the rocks from the ground somehow?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconductivity

    A levitating magnet.
     
  15. Jun 1, 2014 #14

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    No, I don't think Tyson was talking about the atmospheric things at all, he was talking about the star formations and whatever else was visible OUTSIDE the atmosphere. I'm guessing here but my thoughts seem more in line with the tenor of what I remember reading.
     
  16. Jun 1, 2014 #15

    DHF

    User Avatar

    Scientific nits are all well and good. we expect that liberties need to be taken especially with a space opera because sticking to any resemblance of science fact would effectively neuter the Star trek Franchise.

    Problems I have are when drama is created with no thought to any realism even when its preventable. The reactor scene for example could have played out with Kirk actually trying to repair it in a realistic fashion or something resembling realism by using tools or concentrating or doing anything that looks like fixing an not just madly stomping on it. A co worker of mine "fixes" his slow computer by kicking and slapping it which only leas to it eventually winding up on my bench. and I would have to imagine the very center of a antimatter reactor is far more sensitive then a desktop computer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2014
  17. Jun 2, 2014 #16

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It wasn't Avatar, but Titanic. And better let the man explain it himself:

    http://youtu.be/YXh9RQCvxmg?t=35m12s
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Star Trek into Darkness - Most Face Palming moments
  1. Star Trek (Replies: 20)

  2. The Star Trek (Voyager). (Replies: 21)

Loading...