Study Findings: Diabetes Can be Put into Remission w/ Diet

  • Thread starter kyphysics
  • Start date
  • #1
kyphysics
426
362
Some people with Type 2 http://abcnews.go.com/topics/lifestyle/health/diabetes.htm were able to put the disease in remission without medication by following a rigorous diet plan, according to a study published today in the Lancet medical journal.

"Our findings suggest that even if you have had Type 2 diabetes for six years, putting the disease into remission is feasible," Michael Lean, a professor from the University of Glasgow in Scotland who co-led the study, said in a statement.

The researchers looked at 149 participants who have had Type 2 diabetes for up to six years and monitored them closely as they underwent a liquid diet that provided only 825 to 853 calories per day for three to five months. The participants were then reintroduced to solid food and maintained a structured diet until the end of the yearlong study.

The researchers found that almost half of the participants (68 total) were able to put their diabetes in remission without the use of medication after one year. In addition, those who undertook the study also lost an average of more than 20 pounds. Thirty-two of the 149 participants in the study, however, dropped out of the program.

source
https://www.yahoo.com/gma/rigorous-diet-put-type-2-diabetes-remission-study-125809223--abc-news-wellness.html
 
  • Like
Likes jim mcnamara

Answers and Replies

  • #2
jim mcnamara
Mentor
4,688
3,630
Interesting, read it earlier.

One of the standards for remission/diagnosis of Type II is a normal/abnormal a1c hemoglobin test. The people on the reduced calorie diet reversed a1c values, which is interesting. The clinicians I knew back when all felt that type II was a one way street with no uturns allowed. The reason they gave was that the patients had developed insulin resistance - their own cells no longer responded to insulin messages sent by the pancreas.

a1c is a marker for long term blood glucose levels. Normal test result is ~4.0 -> 5.6

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycated_hemoglobin
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)33102-1/fulltext?elsca1=tlpr
 
  • #3
Evo
Mentor
23,925
3,264
Not to mention that they lowered the number that made you diabetic. I was borderline, then they lowered the number, which suddenly made me diabetic, but I went on a low carb diet which lowered my number which made me pre-diabetic. Then I went on a high carb heart healthy diet which then made me diabetic, so I went back on a low carb diet which made me pre-diabetic again.

Anyway, my numbers are so borderline, it doesn't really matter. It's like it's a game. For my heart, I've had both a nuclear stress test and a calcium count due to extremely high cholesterol, but most of that is HDL, which they are now saying is not good. My calcium count was so low, I have the arteries of a healthy 13 year old. My doctor was floored, he was so worried and had me worried. I think it has to do with what I eat, the things I eat prevent the cholesterol from forming hard plaque. Probably thanks to my mom, French Mediterranean, she raised me no fat, lots of beans, not much meat, lots of fish.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Dr. Courtney
Education Advisor
Insights Author
Gold Member
3,333
2,517
Wow, 850 calories per day. Makes me hangry just thinking about that.

I'm high risk for type 2 (95% chance) and put pre-diabetes into remission with diet and exercise, mostly exercise. 1200 calories per day is about as low as I can go. The doc is real happy with my moderate weight loss (15 lbs) and improvements in FPG and A1C. My twin has also made great strides as a type 2 through diet and exercise, again mostly exercise.

Our personal theory is that the human body (at least our two specimens) were not designed to be as sedentary as we had become in modern American life. Exercise is not quite as easy to quantify as calorie intake, but various technologies are making it easier. We both have specific weekly goals set in consultation with are medical advisers. Meeting these goals has brought a level of control that surprised our doctors and won their approval to reducing or eliminating various drugs.
 
  • #5
jim mcnamara
Mentor
4,688
3,630
@Evo - the guidelines at NIH are reasonably clear. "cholesterol" is an aggregate number - LDL-C plus HDL-C. Triglycerides are also of interest. Really high HDL-C is a genetic problem, a genetic variant within the gene SCARB1:
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih...lesterol-doesnt-protect-against-heart-disease

SCARB1 variants do not work the way "normal" SCARB1 works: Normally HDL-C acts to reduce arterial plaque. The variant works the wrong way and increases plaque. Clearly, if your arteries are plaque free your HDL-C is okay. Those numbers are as you know guidelines for physicians, who then interpret data based on their clinical experience. You may see an "NCS" on your personal chart next to a data item. NCS==clinical override, "Not Clinically Significant"
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes jim hardy, Evo and BillTre
  • #6
jim hardy
Science Advisor
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
9,869
4,892
I too am pre-diabetic. Since cutting out virtually all sugar and most carbohydrates for a year+ my glucose is down fifty points to around 115 . I've dropped thirty pounds to within 5 pounds of my high school weight.
Not on insulin yet.

But my arteries seem to clog up. Here's hoping that'll stop too with the diet change.

Good Luck , Evo !

old jim
 
  • #7
Hanni5
3
1
Old Jim,
you are on the right path! Try to bring up your heart rate to 120/min for 20 minutes, at least three times a week. Your cholesterol levels will slowly shift over to the healthy spectrum.
Cheers, Hanni5
 
  • #8
jim hardy
Science Advisor
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
9,869
4,892
Thanks Hanni. I fell off the wagon for a couple weeks but am back now on the regimen. Glucose readings show it, back up to 150 range.

Am going to ask doc about Metformin.
I have a good friend with similar diabetic predisposition who's using it . Interestingly her ancestry is also north European , we have the same sun-intolerant skin and both grew up in Miami...

Doc seemed pleased at followup from last year's stents. The pacemaker recorded four recent 'events' that correlated with my climbing around the junkyard after truck parts and splitting firewood with an 8 pound maul . Oak splits easy but ooohhh that elm !

old jim
 
  • #9
Hanni5
3
1
This is not a medical advice of course...Metformin is one of the oldest and best diabetes drugs. Side effects are very rare. But even with Metformin you will still have to restrict/avoid starchy food intake. The hardest part of being pre-diabetic/type 2 diabetic! :)
Cheers and good luck!
 

Suggested for: Study Findings: Diabetes Can be Put into Remission w/ Diet

Replies
5
Views
534
Replies
6
Views
590
Replies
1
Views
594
Replies
2
Views
836
Replies
5
Views
659
Replies
6
Views
663
  • Last Post
Replies
19
Views
2K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
401
Replies
20
Views
827
Top