[Suggest] Feynman lectures on Physics

In summary, a student studying Mechanical Engineering with a focus on Space and Aircraft is looking for suggestions on how to improve their understanding of physics. They mention studying the book "Aircraft Design" by Daniel P. Raymer and wanting to learn more about aerodynamics. However, they only have a high school level understanding of physics and are wondering if they can learn these topics through the "Feynman Lectures on Physics". The expert summarizer advises that in order to fully understand physics, the student should first study calculus and then move on to college-level physics. They also stress the importance of having a strong foundation in mathematics for a deeper understanding of physics. The student agrees and states that they are a hard worker and believe they can achieve
  • #1
21
0
Hello everyone. I'm studying Mechanical engineering but I'm at Foreign language preparation class. My area is Space and aircraft. I'm studying Aircraft Deisgn (Daniel P. Raymer) and I think I've to improve myself in physics area. I thought that Feynman lectures on physics can be good start. What is your suggestion? Thank you.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
What physics do you already know?
 
  • #3
Just high school level. I'm interesting with Aerodynamic (because aircraft)
 
  • #4
kdrdgn07 said:
Just high school level. I'm interesting with Aerodynamic (because aircraft)

You will need vector calculus to learn this. Start by learning calculus, then practice mechanics. You need to build the foundation first.
 
  • #5
MidgetDwarf said:
You will need vector calculus to learn this. Start by learning calculus, then practice mechanics. You need to build the foundation first.
Ty for suggestion but Can't I learn this topics on feynman?
 
  • #6
kdrdgn07 said:
Ty for suggestion but Can't I learn this topics on feynman?
That's not how it works. First study calculus, then start doing college-level physics. Or at least, study it at the same time. If you want to have deep insights in physics you'll need mathematics.
 
  • #7
NathanaelNolk said:
That's not how it works. First study calculus, then start doing college-level physics. Or at least, study it at the same time. If you want to have deep insights in physics you'll need mathematics.
Bro, essentially you are right. I mean I will exactly do what you said. But I thought that I can do it with one book. I can do this with feynman. I'm a hardworker and I am trusting myself. I can do it.
 

1. What is the format of the Feynman lectures on Physics?

The Feynman lectures on Physics are a set of three volumes, originally given as a series of lectures by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman at Caltech in the early 1960s. They cover a wide range of topics in physics, presented in an informal and engaging style.

2. Who is the target audience for the Feynman lectures on Physics?

The lectures were originally intended for first-year undergraduate students, but have since become popular among a broader audience, including scientists, teachers, and curious individuals interested in learning more about physics.

3. Do the Feynman lectures on Physics cover advanced topics?

Yes, the lectures cover a wide range of topics in physics, from basic concepts to advanced topics such as quantum mechanics and electromagnetism. However, they are presented in a way that is accessible and understandable to non-experts.

4. Are the Feynman lectures on Physics still relevant today?

Yes, the lectures are still highly relevant today. While some of the specific examples and technologies mentioned may be outdated, the underlying concepts and principles presented by Feynman are still fundamental to our understanding of the physical world.

5. Can the Feynman lectures on Physics replace a traditional textbook for learning physics?

The Feynman lectures on Physics are not intended to replace a traditional textbook, but rather to supplement it. They provide a unique perspective and approach to learning physics that can be helpful for students and anyone interested in the subject. However, they may not cover all the material typically found in a traditional textbook.

Suggested for: [Suggest] Feynman lectures on Physics

Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
21
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
868
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
14
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
9
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
2K
Back
Top