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Suitable Container Materials for Plasma

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  1. Jan 18, 2014 #1
    Hi everyone,

    This is my first post here, so go easy on me. :)

    I am looking towards investigating the properties of plasma antennas, where a plasma is created in a sealed container, and the RF signal is either capacitively or inductively coupled and the transmitted.

    However, I am wanting to try a spherical shaped object. I would need to be able to pass two electrodes through opposite poles of the sphere, in order to create the plasma.

    However, I cannot seem to find any glassware which suits the bill. The closest object I can find is something called a chromatography reservoir, as below:
    3f45_1.JPG

    However, the necks on these are a bit small in diameter.

    I was wondering if it might be possible to use a material other than glass?

    Or perhaps someone might know of the correct name of the piece.

    Many thanks for your help in advanced, everyone.

    Smithy
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 19, 2014 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    If one wishes to make a plasma and observe it from the outside, then the vessel probably needs to be ceramic (e.g., glass). Depending on the gas, one could use a two or three neck flask. What gas is one planning on using.

    One could look at discharge lamps, e.g., those already filled with a particular gas, for examples.

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are used for material analysis through optical spectroscopy. That is another example.
     
  4. Jan 19, 2014 #3
    Many thanks for your reply, Astronuc.

    I intend on using Helium.

    I am also attempting to create the diffused sort of plasma, rather than the filament type. Will having the electrodes close together (in a two necked flask) affect this?

    Many thanks again,

    Smithy
     
  5. Jan 19, 2014 #4
    Also, thanks to the admin/mod who moved this to a more appropriate forum. :)
     
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