Surgeries in Full Moon and New Moon

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Surgeries in Full Moon and New Moon!!

Hey Everybody, this is a Question that has been on my mind for so many years, i have a lot....a LOT of Friends whom are doctors (medics), surgeons specifically, and they dont know the other ones...i mean, i`ve known them through my nomadic living in several states....so the point is that Surgeons say that they Hate to Perform surgeries when there is Full moon or New moon....in fact....Scheduled Surgeries they select them through out the mont except FM and NM.....but they hate when they have Guard or On call duty, those days....Cause they say that Patients tend to Bleed more, and Blood is more uncontrollable.....like blood behaving much like Ocean Tides in Those days also!!.....i have ask them if there are studies about that, and they say that why bother in doing a study, when they can see always when an Emergency Happens on a full moon, that the surgerie gets more complicated and bloody.....

What do you Think!!!.....Could Blood behave just like tides!!.....
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Pengwuino
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they say that why bother in doing a study
Surgeons and doctors are not necessarily critical thinkers. If it's true, a study would just confirm it, don't you think?
 
  • #3
Ivan Seeking
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Sept. 23, 2009 -- Full moon. Friday. After 5 p.m. Late summer. They say these are bad times to schedule surgery.

And except for the full moon hex, there are good reasons to think so. Surgical teams may be tired at the end of the day, worn out at the end of the week, or less experienced when new residents arrive in July and August.

But however reasonable or unreasonable, none of these theories holds water, find Cleveland Clinic researchers Daniel I. Sessler, MD; C. Allen Bashour, MD; and colleagues.

"This investigation can help assure future patients who may be concerned -- operation timing and moon phase did not affect outcome in our study," Bashour tells WebMD...
http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20090923/full-moon-fails-foil-surgery
 
  • #4
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A full moon is a moon without any of the Earth's shadow covering it. How would a shadow 240 thousand miles away have any effect on anything here on Earth? Would a shadow on Mars do something to us? What about a shadow on Pluto?
If I turn off the lights, I'll be covered in shadow. It's not 240 thousand miles away, it's actually touching me, yet it has no effect.
 
  • #5
turbo
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A full moon is a moon without any of the Earth's shadow covering it. How would a shadow 240 thousand miles away have any effect on anything here on Earth? Would a shadow on Mars do something to us? What about a shadow on Pluto?
If I turn off the lights, I'll be covered in shadow. It's not 240 thousand miles away, it's actually touching me, yet it has no effect.
No. The full moon is at opposition with respect to the Sun. The only time the Earth's shadow falls on the Moon is during a lunar eclipse. While I discount the theory of excessive bleeding, the "thinking" behind it is that gravitational effects are multiplied when the Earth, Moon, and Sun are lined up. Nothing to do with shadows.
 
  • #6
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No. The full moon is at opposition with respect to the Sun. The only time the Earth's shadow falls on the Moon is during a lunar eclipse. While I discount the theory of excessive bleeding, the "thinking" behind it is that gravitational effects are multiplied when the Earth, Moon, and Sun are lined up. Nothing to do with shadows.
Thanks. I assumed I knew what caused the shadow on the moon. What a stupid thing to assume.
I also assumed I knew why they thought their quack idea worked and I didn't know that either.
Undeterred, I'll still be on the lookout for people who are dumber than I am.
 
  • #7
KalamMekhar


Don't mess with anything on a full moon and a new moon. Don't even go in the woods. Nothing good ever happens on those two days.
 
  • #8
turbo
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Don't mess with anything on a full moon and a new moon. Don't even go in the woods. Nothing good ever happens on those two days.
How valuable is that insight! Perhaps we can extend the bans to days when the sun is in X house of the zodiac, too. Can't be too sure.
 
  • #9
Chronos
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Kinda reminds me of spooky clocks during solar eclipses.
 
  • #10
CEL
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Oceans have tides because the Earth is so huge. The side of the planet that faces the moon is nearer to the satellite than the opposite side, so the gravity of the moon attracts each side differently.
This makes two forces with opposing directions. The Earth bulges in the direction of the Moon and in the opposite direction. The ocean, being fluid, has a greater bulge than the rocks.
A tiny human body makes no difference in the attraction of the Moon. The surgeon, that performs the operation, causes mere tide in the patient than the Moon.
 
  • #11
berkeman
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Nice link, Ivan. I especially like this part:

But none of these risks was more likely at any time of the day, day of the week, month of the year, or phase of the moon.
I think it's true that more strange stuff happens on nights around a full moon, but that's mainly because the extra light helps to encourage more outdoor night-time activity. And unless you're a ninja warrior with night vision goggles, I don't think a new moon will attract much extra activity.
 
  • #12
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Nice link, Ivan. I especially like this part:
And unless you're a ninja warrior with night vision goggles, I don't think a new moon will attract much extra activity.
Yeah, that's me. So watch out! We call very weird or strange people 'Loonies'. The word Loony was derived out of Luna, the name of our moon. Just an interesting idea. Do you suppose that if the effects are not negligible, they are at least minimal? In other words, is there any possibility that the moon's gravitational pull affects blood loss during surgery? In any regard?
 
  • #13
CEL
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Yeah, that's me. So watch out! We call very weird or strange people 'Loonies'. The word Loony was derived out of Luna, the name of our moon. Just an interesting idea. Do you suppose that if the effects are not negligible, they are at least minimal? In other words, is there any possibility that the moon's gravitational pull affects blood loss during surgery? In any regard?
Read my previous post!
 
  • #14
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Typical of a bunch of male chauvinists - nobody's mentioned menstruation.

That happens every 4 weeks to coincide with the moon's phases...
 
  • #15
lisab
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Typical of a bunch of male chauvinists - nobody's mentioned menstruation.

That happens every 4 weeks to coincide with the moon's phases...
My thought, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McClintock_effect" [Broken] that when women spend time in close proximity to other women, their cycles may synchronize. I'm not sure though that surgical teams would spend enough time together for that to happen, though. That would be a very interesting study!
 
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  • #16
CEL
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My thought, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McClintock_effect" [Broken] that when women spend time in close proximity to other women, their cycles may synchronize. I'm not sure though that surgical teams would spend enough time together for that to happen, though. That would be a very interesting study!
How many women do you know that have an exactly 29.5 days cycle?
 
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  • #17
lisab
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How many women do you know that have an exactly 29.5 days cycle?
Yes, that's also my main criticism of the analysis that I linked to. Also, all kinds of things can influence menstrual cycles - illness or stress, for example. It's reasonable to assume that the women who are living in the same conditions could experience these same disruptions. Perhaps that's what's causing the cycles to appear to synchronize.

The theory is controversial, but having experienced it myself, I can't dismiss it completely.
 
  • #18
Evo
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What, exactly, would a tide in the body do? Not that the moon could cause one. Blood pooling in the feet? In the head? What if you moon the moon, would the blood pool in your butt? Who makes this nonsense up?
 
  • #19
lisab
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What, exactly, would a tide in the body do? Not that the moon could cause one. Blood pooling in the feet? In the head? What if you moon the moon, would the blood pool in your butt? Who makes this nonsense up?
Well, it would explain some things. Like, why is it sometimes I'm not hungry, even though I haven't eaten much? Maybe I haven't lost my appetite - I'm just at high tide.
 
  • #20
Evo
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Well, it would explain some things. Like, why is it sometimes I'm not hungry, even though I haven't eaten much? Maybe I haven't lost my appetite - I'm just at high tide.
:rofl:
 

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