Switching between subfields of physics

  • Thread starter Isaiah Gray
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In summary, the individual is currently conducting research in experimental condensed matter physics and is content with their work. However, they also have a strong interest in general relativity and are wondering if they can pursue it in graduate school if they change their mind. The response is that it is possible to switch fields, even after graduate school.
  • #1
Isaiah Gray
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Hi,

I am a sophomore currently doing research in experimental condensed matter physics, and I'm happy with that. However, I have a lingering fascination with general relativity. If I get to graduate school and decide I'd rather work in GR, would I be able to do that?
 
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  • #2
Isaiah Gray said:
Hi,

I am a sophomore currently doing research in experimental condensed matter physics, and I'm happy with that. However, I have a lingering fascination with general relativity. If I get to graduate school and decide I'd rather work in GR, would I be able to do that?
Yes, completely (assuming the school you go to has GR research, etc, etc).
 
  • #3
Nothing you do as an undergrad majoring in physics is going to lock you into a career. You can always switch fields, even after grad school (although the longer you wait, the harder it becomes).
 

Related to Switching between subfields of physics

1. What is the process of switching between subfields of physics?

The process of switching between subfields of physics involves exploring different areas of study, identifying your interests and skills, and determining the steps needed to transition into the new subfield. This may include taking courses, attending conferences or workshops, and networking with experts in the new field.

2. Can I switch between subfields of physics without a background in that particular area?

While having a background in a subfield of physics can be helpful, it is not always necessary to switch into a new subfield. Many skills and concepts in physics are transferable across different areas of study, and with dedication and hard work, it is possible to transition into a new subfield without prior knowledge.

3. How can I determine which subfield of physics is right for me?

The best way to determine which subfield of physics is right for you is to explore different areas of study through courses, research, and conversations with experts. It is also important to consider your interests, skills, and long-term career goals when making this decision.

4. Are there any challenges or obstacles I may face when switching between subfields of physics?

Switching between subfields of physics can be challenging, as it may involve learning new theories, techniques, and terminology. It may also require a significant amount of time, effort, and dedication to become proficient in the new subfield. However, with determination and a strong support system, these challenges can be overcome.

5. Are there any benefits to switching between subfields of physics?

Switching between subfields of physics can have many benefits, including expanding your knowledge and skills, broadening your career opportunities, and potentially making new discoveries or contributions to the field. It can also help you avoid burnout or boredom by providing new challenges and opportunities for growth.

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