Tension in Rope A vs. Rope B: Which is More?

In summary, in a situation where a professional strongman ties rope A to a building and pulls on it, while two other professional strongmen pull on rope B in opposite directions, the tension in both ropes will be the same if all strongmen possess equal strength. This may seem counterintuitive, but according to Newton's Third Law, the force exerted on the ropes by the strongmen will be equal and opposite, resulting in equal tensions in both ropes. To better understand this concept, one can use Newton's First Law and draw a Free Body diagram to visualize the forces acting on the ropes.
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Sorry I deleted the template, it doesn't seem to apply much to this particular problem:

A professional strongman ties rope A to a building and pulls as hard as he can on the rope. Two other professional strongmen take either end of rope B and pull in opposite directions as hard as they can. If all strongmen possesses equal strength, how do the tensions in the rope compare?

It's a multiple choice question and the answer listed is: The ropes have the same tension.

This just doesn't seem correct to me, could anyone enlighten me or confirm my doubts? As I see it, if all the strongmen pull with a force of 10N (perhaps we should call these strongmice instead), then clearly rope A would have a tension of 10N, while rope B would have a tension of 20N.
 
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  • #2
Not as clearly as you think. Just imagine that the wall is a strongman. Whether a strongman or a wall, either would exert the same force on the rope...10N. That's Newton 3. You might want to cut a section thru the rope and draw a Free Body diagram around one of the strongmen, and use Newton 1 for equilibrium.
 
  • #3
PhanthomJay said:
Not as clearly as you think. Just imagine that the wall is a strongman. Whether a strongman or a wall, either would exert the same force on the rope...10N. That's Newton 3. You might want to cut a section thru the rope and draw a Free Body diagram around one of the strongmen, and use Newton 1 for equilibrium.

Thanks for the help, that's just a weird thing to conceptualize.
 

1. What is tension in a rope?

Tension in a rope is the amount of force or pulling stress that is applied to the rope. It is the result of two opposing forces acting on the rope, causing it to stretch or become taut.

2. How is tension measured in a rope?

Tension in a rope is typically measured in units of force, such as newtons or pounds. It can be measured using a tension meter or by calculating the force applied to the rope based on its length and the physical properties of the material.

3. What factors affect tension in a rope?

The tension in a rope is affected by the amount of force applied to it, the length and thickness of the rope, and the type of material it is made of. Other factors such as temperature, friction, and external forces can also impact tension in a rope.

4. Which rope will have more tension, Rope A or Rope B?

The amount of tension in a rope depends on the specific circumstances and factors mentioned above. It is not possible to determine which rope will have more tension without knowing all the relevant information.

5. How does tension in a rope affect its strength?

Generally, the more tension in a rope, the greater its strength. However, if the tension exceeds the breaking point of the rope, it can cause the rope to snap or become damaged. It is important to carefully consider and monitor tension in a rope to ensure its strength and durability.

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