Test set-up for full dark matter simulation

In summary, two researchers are building a dark matter-only simulation using a particle-in-cell approach with the Poisson equation and particle trajectories. They are seeking test cases and are curious about the limitations and specific questions that can be answered with their simulation. They are using the Uintah framework and have decided to focus on a local scale simulation of dark matter halo formation. They are not including hydrodynamics in their simulation, but are interested in other methods such as using the Boltzmann equation.
  • #1
ohannuks
32
2
Hey,

I'm trying to look for a single test set-up for a dark matter-only simulation I and my friend are building. It's currently based on a particle-in-cell approach and we are calculating the Poisson equation and particle trajectories in a co-moving frame (so expansion of the Universe is taken into account).

However, it still lacks hydrodynamics and so I suppose we're neglecting baryonic physics.

Does anyone know of any good test cases for dark matter-only simulations to see if our simulation's predicting correct behaviour?

Since I'm new I'm sorry if I'm posting in the wrong place..

:)
 
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  • #2
Sounds interesting. I'm curious about specifics. Is this simulation to be limited to a small region? Or is it a simulation of dark matter on a very large scale?

What questions might you be trying to answer, using this simulation?

How far back in history do you go? Like, what redshift? what initial density of dark matter?
 
  • #3
The hydrodynamics is important for the active liquid xenon to search for xenon nuclei that recoil in response to collisions caused by an impinging flux of dark matter particles (WIMPS). So your simulation can involve what we would expect from http://lz.lbl.gov/detector/
 
  • #4
Andrekosmos said:
The hydrodynamics is important for the active liquid xenon to search for xenon nuclei that recoil in response to collisions caused by an impinging flux of dark matter particles (WIMPS). So your simulation can involve what we would expect from http://lz.lbl.gov/detector/
I don't think ohannuks plans to simulate a detector.

Hydrodynamics is used here for the motion of dark matter in the universe.
 
  • #5
Hey all and thanks for all the replies.

We used the Uintah framework for doing our simulations. In the end, we decided to make DM-only simulation on local scale, simulating the formation of a dark matter halo and comparing its distribution with the Navarro–Frenk–White profile. The test set-up was fairly simple, we simply initialized it with random distribution. The project was mostly about learning the basics of DM simulations, and we decided not to include hydrodynamics into it. On one hand, it would be nice to have a working code made with a grid framework that boasts scaling up to the largest supercomputers but on the other hand there are already great, working simulation codes such as Gadget-2 and Enzo that do the same thing and more, even if their scaling capabilities are limited.

@marcus, Great to hear you're interested! We were interested in redshifts ~20, merely because most of the articles we read were interested in those redshifts.

@mfb From what I understand dark matter can be assumed to be collisionless, which is why the effect of hydrodynamics is often assumed negligible for dark matter, but not for baryonic matter.

We decided to have our project as a nice in-depth look into advanced numerical grid- and particle methods and an introduction to cosmological simulations (since neither of us are from a cosmology background). We also got immensely interested in other methods for local scales, such as simulating local dynamics via Boltzmann equation; from what I understand this is the next logical step for simulations.

Sorry for the late reply. I will reply a bit earlier next time.
 
Last edited:

Related to Test set-up for full dark matter simulation

1. What is the purpose of a full dark matter simulation?

A full dark matter simulation is used to study the behavior and properties of dark matter in the universe. It allows scientists to understand how dark matter interacts with regular matter and how it influences the formation of galaxies and other large structures in the universe.

2. How is a full dark matter simulation set up?

A full dark matter simulation involves creating a computer model that simulates the gravitational interactions of dark matter particles. The simulation is typically run on a supercomputer and requires complex algorithms and large amounts of data to accurately represent the behavior of dark matter.

3. What data is needed for a full dark matter simulation?

Data such as the distribution and density of dark matter in the universe, as well as the initial conditions of the early universe, are needed for a full dark matter simulation. This data is obtained through observations from telescopes and satellites, as well as theoretical models.

4. How long does it take to run a full dark matter simulation?

The time it takes to run a full dark matter simulation varies depending on the complexity of the model and the computing power available. It can range from a few days to several months or even years.

5. What insights can be gained from a full dark matter simulation?

A full dark matter simulation can provide valuable insights into the nature of dark matter and its role in the formation and evolution of the universe. It can also help test and refine theories about dark matter and potentially lead to new discoveries and advancements in our understanding of the universe.

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