The electromagnetic force of quarks

In summary: This is not consistent with experimental observations. In summary, the electromagnetic force is not enough to bind two quarks of opposite charge tightly enough, leading to a size much larger than what is observed. It also cannot explain the existence of certain particles and larger nuclei. This has been observed through various experimental findings and observations.
  • #1
MacGyver Megh
3
2
TL;DR Summary
Why there is strong force while quarks has charge themselves?
If an up quark has 2/3 of positive charge and down quark has 1/3 of negative charge then why don't they add together by their electromagnetic force?
 
  • Like
Likes ormaaj
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
There are several observational facts that mean that electromagnetism is not enough.

To start with, electromagnetism is not strong enough to bind two quarks of opposite charge as tightly as a nucleus or a meson. Instead, you would get something of a size similar to an atom, which is about five orders of magnitude larger.

Second, electromagnetism could not produce a proton, which has a net positive charge. Instead of being an energetically favoured state, the proton would not constitute a bound state and we would not exist.

Third, electromagnetism cannot explain several other effects that has to do with quarks, such as the color factor appearing in meson production and similar things.
 
  • Like
Likes ormaaj, ohwilleke, MacGyver Megh and 1 other person
  • #3
To add some more problems:
It would allow 1 up and 1 down to combine to a stable particle - but we don't see that in nature.
It would allow individual quarks to be free - but we don't see that in nature.
It would not allow the existence of ##\Delta^{++}## made out of three up quarks or ##\Delta^-## made out of three down quarks - but we found these particles.
It would not allow the existence of larger nuclei - but we see them in nature.
 
  • Like
Likes dextercioby and ohwilleke
  • #4
Could you please tell me why electromagnetism is not enough? And what sort of observations they had been faced?
 
  • #5
MacGyver Megh said:
Could you please tell me why electromagnetism is not enough?
I already told you that:
Orodruin said:
Instead, you would get something of a size similar to an atom, which is about five orders of magnitude larger.
 
  • #6
Orodruin said:
I already told you that:
Can you please give an example or the equations what is five time larger magnitudes?
 
  • #7
MacGyver Megh said:
Can you please give an example or the equations what is five time larger magnitudes?
It means that the radius of the nucleus would be around ##10^5 = 100000## times larger than what is observed.
 

1. What is the electromagnetic force of quarks?

The electromagnetic force of quarks is a fundamental force in nature that describes the interactions between quarks, which are subatomic particles that make up protons and neutrons. This force is responsible for the attraction and repulsion between quarks, and it is mediated by particles called photons.

2. How does the electromagnetic force of quarks affect matter?

The electromagnetic force of quarks plays a crucial role in holding matter together. Quarks are bound together by this force, which allows them to form larger particles such as protons and neutrons. Without the electromagnetic force, matter would not exist as we know it.

3. Can the electromagnetic force of quarks be observed?

The electromagnetic force of quarks cannot be directly observed, but its effects can be seen through experiments and observations of subatomic particles. Scientists use particle accelerators and other high-energy experiments to study the behavior of quarks and the electromagnetic force that binds them.

4. How does the electromagnetic force of quarks differ from other fundamental forces?

The electromagnetic force of quarks is one of the four fundamental forces in nature, along with the strong nuclear force, weak nuclear force, and gravity. It is the only force that affects electrically charged particles, such as quarks and electrons, and it has an infinite range, meaning it can act over any distance.

5. Can the electromagnetic force of quarks be manipulated or controlled?

Currently, scientists do not have the technology to manipulate or control the electromagnetic force of quarks. However, understanding this force is crucial for developing new technologies, such as quantum computing and advanced energy sources. Ongoing research and experiments are aimed at better understanding and harnessing the power of the electromagnetic force of quarks.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
711
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
971
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
1
Views
2K
Back
Top