The Facts Everyone Should Know Test

In summary, the person did poorly on the literature questions and did better on the questions about other cultures.
  • #1
Evo
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
24,017
3,337
Not an idiot

You scored 100% not an idiot! Yay! You got them all right. You may not be a genius, but at least you won't show up on "Jay Walking" any time soon.

http://www.okcupid.com/tests/take?testid=17467732079199013753
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
When he says US centered he's not kidding! I also did badly on the literature questions... this is physics forums after all.
 
  • #3
Alkatran said:
When he says US centered he's not kidding!
Out of curiosity, what did you find US-centric about it? George Washington and George Bush were both on the test, but I think most would know those two.

The others were all people from other places.

I suppose, in theory, that a US citizen might be more aware that Germany (for example) is not a US state, but I would also suspect the Germans would be even more aware of it. Frankly, given the specifics of that question, I think more non-US citizens would get the answer right than US citizens. The particular country involved has something of an identity crisis in that regard.
 
  • #4
Mediocre
You scored 95% not an idiot!
Ok, I think everyone should be able to get every question right. You came close, but you missed one or two. I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you just clicked wrong or something.




My test tracked 1 variable How you compared to other people your age and gender:

You scored higher than 99% on Culturedness

It didn't tell me which ones I got wrong. (But I assume that the civil war thing was one of them.)
 
  • #5
Danger said:
It didn't tell me which ones I got wrong. (But I assume that the civil war thing was one of them.)
I hate it when they don't tell you. Ok, the Civil War one I wouldn't have known if I wasn't in the US.
 
  • #6
Danger said:
Mediocre
You scored 95% not an idiot! <snip>
My test tracked 1 variable How you compared to other people your age and gender: You scored higher than 99% on Culturedness
Boy, are there ever some idiots in your demographic. I scored 100% (all right), and I was only 54% for my age and gender.

Of course, you might have been the only one in your demographic to take that particular test.
 
  • #7
100% too.

I don't actually remember seeing the famous communist, except on Simpsons!
 
  • #8
95% for me too and I'm not sure what I got wrong...

I'm thinking either "Who did Abraham almost kill?" or "Who was the goddess of knowledge?"
 
  • #9
I didn't really find that to be Yankeecentric, but most people from other hemispheres probably would. Unlike the Yank education system, wherein apparently the US is the only country on the planet, we are taught history of all major civilizations (but I can't remember when the Civil War started; I went with 1820's on that, based upon the firearms in service).
Given that Alkatran is a fellow Canuk, I can only assume that the educational establishment has shifted its focus since I got out of school over 30 years ago.
 
  • #10
I notice he misspelled "gandhi" and "odyssey." I got the Christopher Colombus one wrong (95%, 99th percentile).
 
  • #11
Do I even want to know what your signature is about?
 
  • #12
It's a Dilbert cartoon--little ceramic puppies that fit in your nose.
 
  • #13
It was part of a joke about people selling useless things.
 
  • #14
Danger said:
I didn't really find that to be Yankeecentric, but most people from other hemispheres probably would. Unlike the Yank education system, wherein apparently the US is the only country on the planet, we are taught history of all major civilizations (but I can't remember when the Civil War started; I went with 1820's on that, based upon the firearms in service).
Given that Alkatran is a fellow Canuk, I can only assume that the educational establishment has shifted its focus since I got out of school over 30 years ago.
It was 1860's. In the 1820's flintlocks were in service, and it wasn't until the 1840's that percussion-cap ignition became prevalent, and it wasn't until the 1860's that cartridge rifles became widely available.

I got exactly the same score that you did. I'm assuming I missed the Greek goddess of knowledge and maybe counted Canada as a US state.
 
  • #15
I got 100%, but then they did ask me if the Pope was Catholic.
 
  • #16
I got 91% right (mediocre). That would be wrong on the US president picture (I thought it was John Adams??), and one other US-centred question, I believe.

Probably, it was the "It's a wonderful life" question.
I answered Humphrey Bogart, but when I changed that to Jimmy Stewart, my score went up to 95% (keeping John Adams).
 
Last edited:
  • #17
turbo-1 said:
it wasn't until the 1840's that percussion-cap ignition became prevalent
I guess what screwed me up about that was that in a show I saw about the '49 gold rush, cap-and-ball revolvers seemed common enough that I assumed they had been around for a long time.

Now I want a nose puppy. :frown:
Dilbert is about the only thing that I miss from not getting the newspaper any more. I'll have to buy some of the books.
 
Last edited:
  • #18
twisting_edge said:
Out of curiosity, what did you find US-centric about it? George Washington and George Bush were both on the test, but I think most would know those two.

.

About 10 question was US-related (including Columbus).
"What a wonderful life"-this is a US film, US actors
"Jesse Jackson"-US politician, US athletes.
And who knows how George Washington looked like apart from USAns??

Just to mention the 3 worst US-centrisms.
 
  • #19
facts everyone should know:

what is the arabic title of "1001 nights"?

what is the "yoneda lemma?

how many simple groups have order less than 500?

why is there air?

is leoville las cases a "first growth" or "second growth"?

are e and pi algebraically independent?

who is afraid of virginia wolff?

how about them dawgs?

who recorded "transfusion"?

if a surjective group map admits a section, is the domain a semi direct product?

who directed "diabolique"?
 
Last edited:
  • #20
russ_watters said:
95% for me too and I'm not sure what I got wrong...

I'm thinking either "Who did Abraham almost kill?" or "Who was the goddess of knowledge?"

Isaac

Athena

I got 100%

arildno said:
I got 91% right (mediocre). That would be wrong on the US president picture (I thought it was John Adams??), and one other US-centred question, I believe.
Was that just a random guess? It seems strange that a European would know John Adams was a US president, but wouldn't recognize George Washington. I don't think many Americans would recognize a picture of John Adams.
 
  • #21
Dunce, 69%
Can you spell US-centered?
 
  • #22
BobG said:
Was that just a random guess? It seems strange that a European would know John Adams was a US president,
Why? He was one of the Constitution guys wasn't he, along with G.W and Thomas Jefferson?
That's why I remember him.
but wouldn't recognize George Washington.
Okay, this was my reasoning, for what it is worth:
"Thomas Jefferson had a beard, and so had Abe Lincoln, and also a hat.
So it can't be either one of them.
Furthermore, John Adams was fat and George Washington lean, or if George Washington wasn't too lean after all, it would be too easy if it was a picture of him. Therefore, the picture is of John Adams."

Unfortunately, my "reasoning" was all wrong..:frown:
 
  • #23
The president question sort of surprised me. The picture is obviously George Washington, but I thought that it was generally accepted that he was not the first president. There seems to be some ambiguity as to who actually deserves the title, but Washington was merely the first president under the current constitution.

edit: I just realized that this post seems to indicate that the test was asking about the first president. That's not what I meant. It just seems as if every sort of quiz about this subject involves only the 'big' presidents who are fairly easily recognized. Somebody like Fillmore would have stumped me, let alone the half-dozen or whatever that came before Washington.
 
Last edited:
  • #24
Who the hell would have to know "Who starred in "It's a Wonderful Life?""
 
  • #25
You scored 78% not an idiot!

You probably get your news from Regis, don't you? You wouldn't be impossible to have a conversation with, but there would definitely be a few hand-on-forehead moments.

Well, history was never my thing, ever.
 
  • #26
BobG said:
Isaac

Athena
Ok, I should have gotten both of those right. I guess I'm not sure which I got wrong then - I was reasonably certain about the rest.
 
  • #27
Danger said:
The president question sort of surprised me. The picture is obviously George Washington, but I thought that it was generally accepted that he was not the first president. There seems to be some ambiguity as to who actually deserves the title, but Washington was merely the first president under the current constitution.

edit: I just realized that this post seems to indicate that the test was asking about the first president. That's not what I meant. It just seems as if every sort of quiz about this subject involves only the 'big' presidents who are fairly easily recognized. Somebody like Fillmore would have stumped me, let alone the half-dozen or whatever that came before Washington.
There were none before George Washington. What do they teach you in northern North America?
 
  • #28
82%

I missed the Abraham question, the Greek mythology question, and probably another one (mecca question maybe).
 
  • #29
turbo-1 said:
There were none before George Washington. What do they teach you in northern North America?
Before the Constitution of the United States, there was another document called the Articles of Confederation. Here is a url for more information about it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation
That government, was ratified in 1781 and remained in effect until 1788 when the Constitution was ratified. Under that government, there were 8 presidents of the United States:
John Hanson
Elias Boudinot
Thomas Mifflin
Richard Henry Lee
John Hancock
Nathan Gorman
Arthur St. Clair
Cyrus Griffin
However, http://www.snopes.com/history/american/hanson.htm calls this information false.
 
Last edited:
  • #30
The Confederation was just that - an alliance of independent states which ceded very limited authority to the Congressional Congress. The federal government of the United States (and in fact the United States as opposed to 13 autonomous states) was not established until the ratification of the Constitution, and George Washington was the first president of that government.
 
  • #31
Thanks, Jimmy.
The only objection that I have to your second link is the following:

A prime example of why history is best learned from history books, not comic books (or the modern equivalent, web sites of dubious validity).
It seems a bit ironic, since this is itself from a net site, but the main point is that we heard about these (alleged?) previous presidents long before the Internet even existed. I don't think that you can categorize history texts as 'comic books'. The reason that I mentioned the ambiguity is that various sources claimed anywhere from 6 to 10 POTUS's (POTi?), depending upon when the US actually came into existence.
The subject doesn't interest me enough for me to dig into it further, but it does still seem to generate debate among real historians.
 
  • #32
jimmysnyder said:
Before the Constitution of the United States, there was another document called the Articles of Confederation. Here is a url for more information about it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation
That government, was ratified in 1781 and remained in effect until 1788 when the Constitution was ratified. Under that government, there were 8 presidents of the United States:
John Hanson
Elias Boudinot
Thomas Mifflin
Richard Henry Lee
John Hancock
Nathan Gorman
Arthur St. Clair
Cyrus Griffin
However, http://www.snopes.com/history/american/hanson.htm calls this information false.

That's because the similarity in the title's name (President of the United States in Congress Assembled) is a lot greater than the similarity in the position's role in government. Besides, he was only the third president of Congress under the Articles of Confederation. Your list leaves out Samuel Huntington and Thomas McKean (who replaced Huntington for a few months because of Huntington's ill health).

And if you consider them the nation's first leaders, then why not the President of the First Continental Congress, Peyton Randolph? Or, if the fact that we still weren't an independent nation during the First Continental Congress, how about the first President of the Second Continental Congress, which, coincedently, also happened to be Peyton Randolph? The war for independence had already started at the time, making the Second Continental Congress the first colonial government to act independently of England.

Or maybe you prefer John Hancock. He was the second President of the Second Continental Congress, but was president of congress at the time of the Declaration of Independence.

All of the above were presidents of Congress (kind of like being House Speaker), not the leader of an independent executive branch of government, which is why George Washington is considered the first President of the United States. He's the first to fill the role as it exists today.
 
  • #33
There seems to be a lot of debate on this issue from many angles. I have no dog in this race myself. I do note that before the ratification of the Constitution, any entity that could be called the United States is not what is meant by that term today. The urban legend page seems conflicted:

1. John Hanson was president of the United States.
2. The Articles of Confederation did not form the United States into a country, in the same sense that NATO is not a country.
3. Therefore John Hanson was not president of the United States.

?
 
  • #34
They didn't even ask who was the first president of the US :rolleyes:
 
  • #35
78% :) I am a borderline idiot.
 

Similar threads

  • General Discussion
Replies
3
Views
648
  • General Discussion
Replies
33
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
11
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
754
Replies
19
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
2
Replies
36
Views
7K
  • General Discussion
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
10
Views
6K
  • General Discussion
2
Replies
42
Views
7K
  • General Discussion
Replies
7
Views
2K
Back
Top