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The gravitational force of energy

  1. Feb 2, 2013 #1

    anorlunda

    Staff: Mentor

    Energy gravitates. Is is so simple as to replace M in gravitational euqations with E/c*c ?

    F=[itex]\frac{G*M\underline{1}*M\underline{2}}{DM\underline{1,2}}[/itex]=F=[itex]\frac{G*E\underline{1}*E\underline{2}}{c\overline{4}*DM\underline{1,2}}[/itex]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2013 #2

    anorlunda

    Staff: Mentor

    Whoops, forgive me for screwing up the latex. I clicked on post too early.
     
  4. Feb 2, 2013 #3

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Wouldn't you just replace it with E after finding the equivalent energy content for an objects mass?
     
  5. Feb 2, 2013 #4
    If it's internal energy, e.g. heat or chemical, yes it is that simple. I'm not sure about kinetic energy though. Especially when the object's velocity is close to c.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2013 #5
    For kinetic energy, I believe the answer lies in the Einstein field equations, but I don't know how to solve the Weyl curvature. But, there is a frame dragging effect from a moving mass, which creates a gravity which isn't radial. There's a formal analogy to magnetism, called gravitoelectromagnetism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitoelectromagnetism, which might answer your question.
     
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