The side of my rear tire popped!

  • Thread starter Ironside
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

So I was driving down the road the other day, when I unknowingly drove over a pothole, I was not going even 15mph, and my rear tire popped, I stopped to notice what was wrong, and to my dissatisfaction, the side of the tire had popped. Naturally I'm pissed because apparently theres nothing I can do other than buy a new tire. Is there a way I can fix tires that popped on the side?

I thought no other place to ask this question in than Engineering forum of PF. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
OmCheeto
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So I was driving down the road the other day, when I unknowingly drove over a pothole, I was not going even 15mph, and my rear tire popped, I stopped to notice what was wrong, and to my dissatisfaction, the side of the tire had popped. Naturally I'm pissed because apparently theres nothing I can do other than buy a new tire. Is there a way I can fix tires that popped on the side?

I thought no other place to ask this question in than Engineering forum of PF. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
What millenia was the tire manufactured?
 
  • #3
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4000 BC , can you help?
 
  • #4
turbo
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Sidewall damage is fairly common in northern climates, and many tire companies will do nothing for you. Your retailer may provide road-hazard damage protection, but mostly that means that they will pull out a nail or screw and install a plug. Sidewall damage means replacement of the whole tire, and you don't generally get any guarantees in that regard.
 
  • #5
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So there's no way or method I can personally even attempt eh. That sucks >_<
 
  • #6
turbo
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So there's no way or method I can personally even attempt eh. That sucks >_<
No. You cannot safely repair a sidewall delamination. No way.
 
  • #7
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In the UK, it's illegal to fix damage to the sidewall - not sure about other countries.

It's dangerous. The only option is to buy a new tire.

Besides, you need the proper equipment to remove a tire from the rim. Doing that manually is extremely difficult.
 
  • #8
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Sidewalls are where all the load is taken, as such they should not be repaired.
 
  • #9
Ranger Mike
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is your life worth $ 100.00??
there is too much flex and not enough material to permit repair of sidewall puncture
get a new tire
 
  • #10
AlephZero
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Sidewall damage means replacement of the whole tire, and you don't generally get any guarantees in that regard.
This side of the Atlantic, the warranty may cover you for a reduced cost of replacement depending on the amount of tread wear, i.e. if the tread was 50% worn you get a replacement at half price, etc.

The only (but most likely illegal) "repair" would be to fit an inner tube.
 
  • #11
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Is the sidewall of your tire damage? or did the tire pop from the rim? If the tire popped from the rim, that's a relatively easy/cheap fix as long as your tire is not damage.
 
  • #12
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check your other 3 good tires, are they low? chances are if they are, so was the 4th. and if it was low, you have no one to blame but yourself.
 
  • #13
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check your other 3 good tires, are they low? chances are if they are, so was the 4th. and if it was low, you have no one to blame but yourself.
Low pressure isn't the sole cause of a blowout. There are a number of causes that could be behind it.

The other three tyres, being independent of each other (and the fourth) don't indicate anything.

The four tyres on my car are topped up each month, but they all have vastly different values at the end of that month (some out by as much as 10 psi depending on conditions).
 
  • #14
Ranger Mike
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from strickly a race car guy point of view...ifin you got 10 psi diff over a month...something mechanical is wrong..
valve stem leak/defect
bead seal
slow leak in tire itself
leak in aluminum wheel is most likely..we have this alot in racing
bleeding thru side walls..
no way is ten pounds leak normal
 
  • #15
2,685
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from strickly a race car guy point of view...ifin you got 10 psi diff over a month...something mechanical is wrong..
valve stem leak/defect
bead seal
slow leak in tire itself
leak in aluminum wheel is most likely..we have this alot in racing
bleeding thru side walls..
no way is ten pounds leak normal
Not sure what causes it. I've put them in a water tank to check for any bubbles but nothing.

At the moment I'm chalking it up to the cold over winter with a very, very slow leak.

The average difference they are out by is ~4psi. It's just every now and then they are way down.
 
  • #16
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Buy better tyres! You pauper student you. I remember the tyres on my Golf when I was a student were nearly slicks because I couldn't afford new ones, made driving in the wet fun, fortunately I didn't drive it much as it only even had about £10 worth of petrol in it at any one time. Good times.

10psi difference over a month isn't a slow leak though, even 4psi is a fair bit.

The thing with tyres is you can't really stick them in water and expect to see anything, the air will come out when they tyre is under load. If you could see bubbles in water then you'd know about before hand as the tyre would be flat.

You could try getting a cheap can of that spray stuff that coats the inside of the tyre, that would stop any slow leaks. If it still does it then it's a sealing problem.
 
  • #17
2,685
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Buy better tyres! You pauper student you. I remember the tyres on my Golf when I was a student were nearly slicks because I couldn't afford new ones, made driving in the wet fun, fortunately I didn't drive it much as it only even had about £10 worth of petrol in it at any one time. Good times.
The tyres are half worn, that fuel thing sounds familiar though.
10psi difference over a month isn't a slow leak though, even 4psi is a fair bit.
It's only over winter that major differences are shown. It hardly changes over summer. Plus the gauges aren't exactly the worlds most accurate so you have to take it with a pinch of salt.
The thing with tyres is you can't really stick them in water and expect to see anything, the air will come out when they tyre is under load. You could try getting a cheap can of that spray stuff that coats the inside of the tyre, that would stop any slow leaks.
General leaks are around the rim and valve. Bung it in water and you'll see something around those areas. Well, that's how we did it in the garage I worked at anyway - the key was to over inflate the tyre.
 

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