The Standard Model (What Don't I know?)

In summary, the standard model proposes that major forces are exchanged through elementary particles. If a material was discovered that could block photons, would an object wrapped in this material be unaffected by the electromagnetic force? This raises questions about the type of exchange that occurs between particles. Lead is effective in blocking some forces, but not magnetism. Even if the hypothetical graviton exists, it is unlikely that blocking it would allow us to defy gravity, as gravity is a result of the curvature of spacetime.
  • #1
MrJohnnyPrice
6
0
A big part of the theory of the standard model is that the major forces are mediated by the exchanging of elementary particles. So hypothetically, if we discovered some material that blocked the photon, for example, does this mean an object wrapped in this material would be unaffected by the electromagnetic force?

Basically this is a question about what kind of exchanging of particles we're talking about. Is it an exchange in the sense of how atoms exchange electrons, or am I completely off?
 
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  • #2
Last I checked, Lead works pretty well.
 
  • #3
Oh, so follow-up question: If the graviton exists, and if there is a material to block it, we would theoretically be able to defy gravity?
 
  • #4
Gravitons are speculative and even if they existed, I don't believe so. Gravity is the curvature of spacetime and thus the attraction between two objects wouldn't be affected by a material between the two objects.

Nabeshin said:
Last I checked, Lead works pretty well.

Lead doesn't block magnetism, which is an electromagnetic force.
 
  • #5


I can confirm that the Standard Model is a widely accepted theory that describes the fundamental particles and forces in the universe. It is based on the idea that the four fundamental forces - gravity, electromagnetism, strong nuclear force, and weak nuclear force - are mediated by the exchange of elementary particles.

In regards to your question, it is important to understand that the exchange of particles in the Standard Model is not the same as the exchange of electrons in an atom. In the Standard Model, particles such as photons, gluons, and W and Z bosons are responsible for mediating the forces between particles. These particles are not physical objects like electrons, but rather they are excitations of fields that permeate space.

So, if we were to discover a material that blocks photons or any other elementary particle, it would not necessarily mean that an object wrapped in this material would be completely unaffected by the electromagnetic force. This is because the exchange of particles is not the only mechanism through which forces act on objects. In the case of the electromagnetic force, for example, there are also static electric and magnetic fields that can exert a force on an object.

Furthermore, the Standard Model is a quantum theory, meaning that it describes the behavior of particles at a subatomic level. It is not applicable to macroscopic objects or materials. So even if we were to find a material that could block certain particles, it would not necessarily have the same effect on larger objects.

In summary, the exchange of particles in the Standard Model is a complex concept and it is not equivalent to the exchange of electrons in an atom. While a material that blocks certain particles may have an impact on the forces acting on objects, it would not completely eliminate their effects. As scientists, we continue to explore and understand the intricacies of the Standard Model and its implications for our understanding of the universe.
 

1. What is the Standard Model?

The Standard Model is a theory in particle physics that describes the fundamental particles and their interactions, including the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces.

2. How was the Standard Model developed?

The Standard Model was developed through decades of experiments and observations by physicists, including the work of scientists like Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, and Murray Gell-Mann.

3. What are the limitations of the Standard Model?

While the Standard Model is a successful theory, it does not fully explain certain phenomena such as dark matter, dark energy, and gravity. It also does not account for the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe.

4. What is the role of the Higgs Boson in the Standard Model?

The Higgs Boson is a particle predicted by the Standard Model that gives other particles their mass. Its discovery in 2012 confirmed the existence of the Higgs field, which is responsible for giving particles their mass.

5. Are there any efforts to extend or improve upon the Standard Model?

Yes, many scientists are working on theories that go beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and string theory. These theories aim to explain the limitations of the Standard Model and provide a more complete understanding of the universe.

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