The word "won't" does not look logically formed

  • #26
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I usually stumble over fiber.
You shouldn't shuffle your feet. Take higher steps.
 
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  • #27
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The French say at least what they write: table, not tabel.
How about monsieur, s'il vous plait, and Qu'est-ce que c'est? for starters?
 
  • #28
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How about monsieur, s'il vous plait, and Qu'est-ce que c'est? for starters?
I meant especially the 'le' vs. 'el' and 're' vs. 'er' situation. I assume that part of my trouble with certain words comes from the difference between french and english: die Faser = la fibre = the fiber. Or it simply looks too german (Fieber = fever) and I overcompensate.
 
  • #29
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You mean fibre, of course.

Like litre and metre. :wink:
and centre...
 
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  • #30
phinds
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The word "won't" does not look logically formed
It ain't. Get over it.
 
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  • #31
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It ain't. Get over it.
Where did ain't come from.
Used to mean "are not", but now you get the ruler for using it.
Well , maybe not now, but at one time, when teachers had the powre pohwa.

EDIT: changed power to a Boston accent.
 
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  • #32
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Where did ain't come from.
Used to mean "are not", but now you get the ruler for using it.
Well , maybe not now, but at one time, when teachers had the powre.
The Wikipedia Ain't article covers this well enough -- It contains a reference to 'rhoticity' -- 'whether' or 'whethə' the 'r' is pronounced or not, when it immediately follows, but does not immediately precede, another vowel -- fascinating fodder for amateur philologists.
 
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  • #33
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Used to mean "are not", but now you get the ruler for using it.
Originally "ain't" was a contraction of "am not" per the Wiki article that @sysprog referred to. More recently it has become a contraction for am not, is not, and are not.

As a side note, I was watching an Irish series called "Blood" and one character said "I amn't," something I'd never heard before.
 
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  • #34
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Syntactic quirks from the language that brought you sentences like
'James, while John had had "had", had had "had had"; "had had" had had a better effect on the teacher'
 
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  • #36
George Jones
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Heh. I like that. I'm going to start writing all my correspondence using British/Canadian spellings for lable, decible, reble and lible.

Once, while working in the U.S., I comment to a colleague that for some words, Canadians commonly use British spelling, while for other words, Canadians commonly use American spelling. Former, "colour"; latter, "tire". My colleague then asked "Do Canadians spell 'civilization' with an ess or a zee?" I replied "Canadians spell 'civilization' with a zed."
 
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  • #38
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I hope the baker gave the answer in pie-cas.
 
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  • #39
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Very interesting. I had wondered about this too. Just figured it was something we borrowed but really had no idea other than that.
 

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