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Time taken for the big mass to achieve max amplitude

  1. Jun 30, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    the driver is made to oscillate. then the energy will be transferred to the other bob . the other bob oscillate as well

    all the ball are of the same frequency, as they have the same length. the air resistance is significant for smaller mass bob(paper bob) , so it has smaller amplitude compared to metal bob. my question is what's the time taken for both the bob to reach maximum amplitude( as shown in the photo) ,

    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution

    my ans would be the paper bob would take longer time to reach maximum amplitude... as at the given same time frame, the displacement of metal bob from equlibrium position is greater than of the paper bob



    what's wrong with the server? i cant upload the image...

    here's the image
    http://i.imgur.com/sB47t3l.jpg


    http://i.imgur.com/3yiziKX.jpg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 1, 2014 #2
    Please help me on this! Thank you
     
  4. Jul 1, 2014 #3

    BiGyElLoWhAt

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    What have you tried? Are we looking at damped oscillation or driven damped?
     
  5. Jul 1, 2014 #4
    The question makes no sense, The picture is useless, the grammar is not helping...
     
  6. Jul 1, 2014 #5

    BiGyElLoWhAt

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    I agree to an extent. I think I understand what is being asked, but I don't really know what we're dealing with here, and I have no idea how to go about it with the given information. Not even a list of known values?
     
  7. Jul 2, 2014 #6
    This is my own question here. Just to verify my concept.
     
  8. Jul 2, 2014 #7
    I refer to the driven pendulum. Condition: no dampling occur.
     
  9. Jul 2, 2014 #8

    BiGyElLoWhAt

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    So it's driven, as if by a motor, but no dampening? So no drag?
     
  10. Jul 2, 2014 #9
  11. Jul 3, 2014 #10

    BiGyElLoWhAt

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    whats the time it takes an object oscillating at omega to reach max amplitude? or what does math amplitude mean mathematically?

    If i have a position function Asin(omega t + phi) = x
    what must x equal in order for the oscillator to be at max amplitude?
     
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