Torque Equilibrium-illustration attached

  • Thread starter PoPrOcKsRoCk
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Torque
In summary, the conversation discusses calculating the total torque about a point to determine if an object is in equilibrium. The equation T=Fr sin(theta) is used to find T1 and T2, but the correct answer is not obtained due to not considering the direction of the torques. The right hand rule is suggested as a method for determining the direction of the torques.
  • #1
PoPrOcKsRoCk
8
0

Homework Statement



Is the object in equilibrium? To answer that question calculate the total torque about a point where 100 N force is applied. (x=1.95 m. y=1.06 m, F1=38 N, F2=52 N.)

Homework Equations



T=Fr sin(theta)

The Attempt at a Solution



I used the above equation to find the T1 and T2 but it is telling me I am wrong.

T1=38*1.95m T2=52*1.06
T1=74.1 N*m T2=55.12 N*m

Then I added these two torques for the net torque and got 129.22 N*m but it keeps coming up wrong. Am I doing something wrong?
 

Attachments

  • untitled2.bmp
    260.6 KB · Views: 671
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
PoPrOcKsRoCk said:

Homework Statement



Is the object in equilibrium? To answer that question calculate the total torque about a point where 100 N force is applied. (x=1.95 m. y=1.06 m, F1=38 N, F2=52 N.)

Homework Equations



T=Fr sin(theta)

The Attempt at a Solution



I used the above equation to find the T1 and T2 but it is telling me I am wrong.

T1=38*1.95m T2=52*1.06
T1=74.1 N*m T2=55.12 N*m

Then I added these two torques for the net torque and got 129.22 N*m but it keeps coming up wrong. Am I doing something wrong?
Yes, you are adding the 2 torques together, but one torque acts clockwise, the other acts counterclockwise.
 
  • #3
At the pivot though the angle is 90 degrees. So how would you determine which is clockwise and which is counterclockwise?
 
  • #4
PoPrOcKsRoCk said:
At the pivot though the angle is 90 degrees. So how would you determine which is clockwise and which is counterclockwise?
imagine F1 acting alone, upwards. It would tend to rotate the object clockwise like the minute hand of a grandfather clock. Imagine F2 alone, acting up, that upward force would tend to rotate the object the other way (counterclockwise). If you can't visualize this, try the 'right hand rule'. Place your four fingers in line with the force, and curl your fingers toward the pivot, The direction of the curl is ccw or cw (thumb points out or thumb points in). For F2, this is relatively easy to do. For F1, you might strain your wrist.:wink:
 
  • #5
ok thank you I got it.
 

Related to Torque Equilibrium-illustration attached

1. What is torque equilibrium?

Torque equilibrium is a state in which all the forces acting on an object are balanced, causing the object to remain at rest or continue moving at a constant velocity.

2. How is torque equilibrium illustrated?

Torque equilibrium can be illustrated using a free-body diagram, which shows all the forces acting on an object and their direction and magnitude. In the diagram, the object is at rest or moving at a constant velocity, indicating that the forces are balanced.

3. What is the equation for torque equilibrium?

The equation for torque equilibrium is ΣF = 0, which means that the sum of all the forces acting on an object must equal zero for the object to be in equilibrium.

4. What factors affect torque equilibrium?

The factors that affect torque equilibrium include the magnitude and direction of the forces acting on the object, the distance between the forces, and the point where the forces are applied to the object.

5. How is torque equilibrium used in real-life applications?

Torque equilibrium is used in various real-life applications, such as engineering and construction, to ensure that structures and objects are stable and do not topple over due to unbalanced forces. It is also used in physics experiments to understand and analyze the forces acting on an object.

Similar threads

Replies
6
Views
964
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
34
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
8K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
Back
Top