Translational and Rotational Energy

In summary, the conversation discussed the effects of an initial blow on a cylinder that was sliding on the ground. It was determined that the cylinder's rotation and friction with the ground would contribute to its translational velocity, potentially causing it to slow down. However, the concept of rotations involving sliding objects was not fully understood by one of the participants.
  • #1
hatephysics
9
0
solved. thank you
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Well, if the initial blow imparted a sizeable rotation, AND the cylinder was sliding on the ground, (while rotating) eventually the sliding would slow due to the friction with the ground and the cylinder's rotation could contribute to its translational velocity.
 
  • #3
AEM said:
Well, if the initial blow imparted a sizeable rotation, AND the cylinder was sliding on the ground, (while rotating) eventually the sliding would slow due to the friction with the ground and the cylinder's rotation could contribute to its translational velocity.

Thank You for taking the time to reply.

But, I still don't quite get this. Wouldn't the friction cause the cylinder to have less energy and, therefore, a slower cylinder rotation and a slower translational velocity? Maybe, it is because I don't quite understand rotations involving objects that slide? Currently, I am only dealing with objects that do not slip.
 

Related to Translational and Rotational Energy

1. What is translational energy?

Translational energy is the energy possessed by an object due to its motion in a straight line. It is dependent on the mass and velocity of the object, and can be converted into other forms of energy, such as heat or potential energy.

2. How is rotational energy different from translational energy?

Rotational energy is the energy possessed by an object due to its rotational motion around an axis. It is dependent on the mass, shape, and angular velocity of the object. Unlike translational energy, rotational energy cannot be converted into other forms of energy.

3. How are translational and rotational energy related?

Translational and rotational energy are both forms of kinetic energy, and they can be converted into each other in certain situations. For example, when a rotating object with a fixed axis is brought to a stop, its rotational energy is converted into translational energy.

4. How is translational and rotational energy important in everyday life?

Translational and rotational energy are important in many aspects of everyday life, from the movement of vehicles to the rotation of gears in machines. They are also essential in sports, such as when a soccer ball is kicked or a gymnast performs a routine with various rotations.

5. Can translational and rotational energy be calculated separately?

Yes, translational and rotational energy can be calculated separately using their respective formulas. However, in some cases, they may be interrelated and both forms of energy must be considered in the overall energy calculation.

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