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Transverse waves moving (a string)

  1. Sep 30, 2015 #1
    in transverse wave (traveling pulse) when a particle move down it has maximum velocity at equilibrium point , why it stop suddenly at this point?
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 30, 2015 #2
    It does?
     
  4. Sep 30, 2015 #3
    yes
     
  5. Sep 30, 2015 #4
    What makes you think this? Do you have a specific example in mind?
     
  6. Sep 30, 2015 #5
    a disturbance in one region of
    rope and
    , the
    propagation of this
    disturbance
    to other regions
     
  7. Sep 30, 2015 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    I can appreciate how it may look as if the string stops. But you would need to see exactly how the single pulse is formed and how it's actually driven.
    I it may be that your OP is based on what you have learned about continuous waves ( even just simple sine waves) where the maximum speed is at the zero crossing. Things are different for single pulses.
     
  8. Sep 30, 2015 #7
    explain about single pulse,
    where does maximum speed occure?
     
  9. Sep 30, 2015 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    Probably at the steepest part of the pulse. As with a sine waveform.
    It has to be slowing down as it approaches the middle (displacement =0)
    In practice, such a unidirectional pulse could be hard to impress on a string. There could be overswing below the line.
     
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