Treatment for victim from radiation overdose

In summary, there is no cure for those who received radiation overdoses, but there are treatments to mitigate the effects.
  • #1
darkar
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0
Is there any treatment to cure those victim who got radiation overdose?
 
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  • #2
I don't think there really is anything you can do, the body needs to heal the tissues that have been damaged by the radiation.

There are some cases where patients are put into a hyperbaric chamber, to increase the oxygen delivery to the damaged tissues, since local bloodvessels might be damaged.
 
  • #3
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  • #4
I guess it's sort of analogous to burns, whilst you can't cure them, you can do a fair amount to mitigate the effects and help recovery.

I seem to remember the injection of iodine into the bloodstream will help to stop radioactive idodine found in nuclear accident sites from being absorbed by the thyroid gland.

Here's some details and other treatments.

http://www.chemistry.org/portal/a/c/s/1/feature_ent.html?id=c373e9f5f2d57e5c8f6a4fd8fe800100"
 
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  • #5
It depends on how much dose a person receives. The dose at which 50% of the population dies within 60 days without treatment is about 500 rem acute whole body dose. At this dose (called hemopoeitic syndrome), a person's bone marrow is sharply ablated and there is serious risk of infections. There is usally some hemorrhaging as well. However, with modern medical treatments (such as transfusions, clean rooms, etc.) the risk of death is reduced, though the victim can continue to have complications for months. At higher doses, the GI tract is affected, which complicates matters even more. At doses high enough to affect the central nervous system (around 1000 remwhole body), the only real treatments are palliative. At really high doses (2500 rem+), the vicitm is usually unconscious within a few hours and dies in several days.
Please note that these doses are hundreds of times the annual maximum dose allowed by regulatory agencies, and thousands of times the natural background radiation. This means the only real way to get this kind of dose is accidentally.
 
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Related to Treatment for victim from radiation overdose

1. What is the recommended treatment for a victim of radiation overdose?

The recommended treatment for a victim of radiation overdose depends on the severity of the exposure. Immediate and short-term treatments include decontamination of the skin and clothes, as well as administration of potassium iodide to prevent thyroid damage. Long-term treatments may include supportive care, such as blood transfusions and antibiotics, as well as medications to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

2. How is the severity of a radiation overdose determined?

The severity of a radiation overdose is determined by the amount of radiation the person was exposed to, as well as the duration of exposure. This can be measured using a dosimeter, which is a device that measures the amount of radiation absorbed by the body. Other factors such as the type of radiation and the location of exposure may also affect the severity.

3. Can a person recover from a radiation overdose?

Yes, a person can recover from a radiation overdose with appropriate treatment. The extent of recovery will depend on the severity of the exposure and the effectiveness of the treatment. In some cases, there may be long-term effects on the body, but with proper care, a person can lead a relatively normal life.

4. Are there any natural remedies for radiation overdose?

There are no proven natural remedies for radiation overdose. The most effective treatment is medical care from trained professionals. Some people may suggest using herbs or supplements, but these have not been scientifically proven to treat radiation overdose and may even be harmful.

5. What should I do if I suspect someone has been exposed to radiation?

If you suspect someone has been exposed to radiation, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. Do not attempt to treat the person yourself. Make sure the person is removed from the source of radiation and decontaminate them by removing their clothes and washing their skin with soap and water. Call emergency services and provide them with information about the suspected exposure.

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