Two fairly simple, but unrelated queries.

  • Thread starter Bashyboy
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Hi,

First, I was wondering, can electrolytic solution only be produced if its solute is an ionic compound? And, secondly, on one of my chemistry professors power points, he has written on it, regarding solutes, "changes phase (if different from solvent." Does he mean that it changes phase--the solute--when dissolved in the solvent?

Thank you
 

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Borek
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Solution must be conductive, that means ions must be present. In most cases that means you need to dissolve some ionic substance. However, there are examples of non ionic substances that will do the same. Hydrochloride - as a gas - is not ionic, the bond is covalent, yet upon dissolution it becomes a strong electrolyte.

he has written on it, regarding solutes, "changes phase (if different from solvent." Does he mean that it changes phase--the solute--when dissolved in the solvent?
I am not sure I understand your question - yes, "changes phase" means "changes phase". I bet he means solid is no longer solid after dissolution, but if you mix ionic liquid with water there is no phase change.
 

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