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UCLA group discovers massive prime number

  1. Sep 29, 2008 #1

    Math Is Hard

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    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26914730/from/ET/
    Go Bruins!
     
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  3. Sep 29, 2008 #2

    Art

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    What do they use these large prime numbers for? I think I heard one time it was something to do with encryption but if so how does it work? Or is it just for fun?

    Edit - I looked it up and it seems encryption is based on the product of 2 large primes (public key) and the primes themselves (private key) but seeing as how 128 bit encryption already yields 3,835,341,275,459,350,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 different prime numbers which would take a computer 121,617,874,031,562,000 years to crack why bother looking for bigger ones or do primes have other uses?
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2008
  4. Sep 29, 2008 #3
    Pffft. Chuck norris counted to infinity,.............twice. Don't see him boasting.
     
  5. Sep 29, 2008 #4

    Art

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    I've told Chuck a million times not to exaggerate.
     
  6. Sep 29, 2008 #5
    I found the smallest prime number.
     
  7. Sep 29, 2008 #6

    Art

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    Speaking of which why isn't '1' a prime number any more? It used to be. As all other non-prime numbers except '1' are composite numbers it seems unfair to cast the number '1' out into no-man's land.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2008
  8. Sep 29, 2008 #7
    You can define prime number as you wish. However, if you define it so that 1 is prime, then you lose the unique factorization theorem among others.
     
  9. Sep 29, 2008 #8

    Art

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    Hey somebody has to stick up for the little guys :biggrin:

    I think there should be a '1' is prime campaign.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2008
  10. Sep 29, 2008 #9

    Borek

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  11. Sep 29, 2008 #10

    Borek

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    I don't have any reference at hand, but I think this information must be outdated. 512 bits key can be breaken in a reasonable time - it was done for the first time not later than in 2000.
     
  12. Sep 29, 2008 #11

    LowlyPion

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    Vista was too slow?
     
  13. Sep 29, 2008 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    To find very large prime numbers is impressive, but to find one so large that it has mass is really astounding!

    Where did they find it?
     
  14. Sep 29, 2008 #13

    Art

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    :rofl: Maybe it was produced in the LHC.
     
  15. Sep 29, 2008 #14

    Art

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    Drat, Pipped at the post!! I only had 121,617,874,031,561,999 years left in my project to be the first to break it.
     
  16. Sep 29, 2008 #15

    Moonbear

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    :rofl:

    I'm also wondering "why" as well. Is there a useful reason to need to know it, or is it just a weird hobby that math geeks have?
     
  17. Sep 29, 2008 #16
    I read somewhere that a quantum computer was built that factored the number 15. That was my public key.
     
  18. Sep 29, 2008 #17

    Moonbear

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    Oh, that took a LOOOOOOONNNNNGGGGGG time to sink in. GROAN!
     
  19. Sep 29, 2008 #18

    Art

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    Let's face, it with 13 million figures they could tell us anything. It's not as if we're going to go away and check it.
     
  20. Sep 29, 2008 #19
    I think that we should move on from prime numbers to something more interesting.

    Maybe morphing a code with a similar concept to Arnold's Cat Map. That would be fun. (unless they already have done that in which case I just feel stupid).
     
  21. Sep 29, 2008 #20

    Ivan Seeking

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    Yes, but it had the answer before it started the calculation.
     
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