UNDERgrad degree after my undergrad? A technical question

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Hello everyone,

To make a long story short. I was an engineering student, but due to some reasons I didn't continue in it anymore, and did pursue another passion: Political Science. I still have my passion for natural sciences, in particular physics and biology (I love math, so much)

I'm now considering to apply for grad schools in either political science or history fields. However, I'm considering that I may want to apply for an undergrad degree but haven't narrowed down my options enough.

My question is: Is there a better chance for a person with undergrad degree to get accepted into another undergrad degree after his graduation from the first? Or will it be more difficulty and grad school will be the make-sense option?

Thanks in advance,
 

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  • #2
Vid
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How many poli sci classes did you take? Do you know any political theory? If your interest in politics is being spurred by newpapers and elections, this is like someone deciding to move to physics after reading an elegant universe. Make sure you know what you're getting into before you make any decisions. A grad school may accept you if you have enough of an undergraduate background.
 
  • #3
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How many poli sci classes did you take? Do you know any political theory? If your interest in politics is being spurred by newpapers and elections, this is like someone deciding to move to physics after reading an elegant universe. Make sure you know what you're getting into before you make any decisions. A grad school may accept you if you have enough of an undergraduate background.
did you read the OP at all? he has a poli sci degree.

to the OP: i don't know if it'll directly improve your chances but if you did well enough in your general ed credits then you should just transfer those over and your gpa in those classes will directly effect whether you get accepted or not.
 
  • #4
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did you read the OP at all? he has a poli sci degree.

to the OP: i don't know if it'll directly improve your chances but if you did well enough in your general ed credits then you should just transfer those over and your gpa in those classes will directly effect whether you get accepted or not.
You must have some magic reading abilities since nothing he said implied a poli sci degree....
 
  • #5
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Thanks Vid and ice109;

Actually to re-phrase: currently I'm pursuing a poli sci degree, and at the moment I'm considering either to apply for a grad school to be enrolled in after my graduation, or to apply for another undergrad degree after I completely finish my poli sci degree, which will be this spring.
 
  • #6
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I confess, I'm not understanding. You will be getting a poly sci degree. Poly sci is what you want to pursue. Why would you even *think* about another undergrad degree?

Even if you are interested in history, I would think that an undergraduate poly sci would be sufficient there as well.
 
  • #7
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Why do you want to do another undergrad degree?
 
  • #8
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Good questions, TMFKAN64 and mal4mac:

The option that I favor and its best is to go to grad school. However, I must say that I have some areas in my application with significant weakness -- some of these areas were under my control, others I do not give myself full responsibility-- and this did let me wonder if applying for an undergrad degree in the next field will give me a better chances.

I think I need to be more organized. As in, I am now considering a degree in polic sci, history, physics or engineering for grad school: I mentioned them as in my order of priorities taking everything into consideration.

So considering all things the same: Will someone who have graduated with a bachelor degree have a better chance when applying to ANOTHER bachelor degree, let's say in field X, than applying for a grad degree in the same exact field X?
 
  • #9
Vanadium 50
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Many schools will not take you on as an undergrad if you have a BA already.
 
  • #10
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@Vanadium 50, why not? Know of any universities that are exceptions?
 
  • #11
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Many schools will not take you on as an undergrad if you have a BA already.
if this is really true then don't report the BA, only report the AA. make up some excuse about dropping out for family/health/money reasons. i can't see how they could possibly investigate further.

if you didn't get an AA from the institution you're about to get you're BA from go get one, you can still request it.
 
  • #12
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Many schools will not take you on as an undergrad if you have a BA already.
Perhaps it depends on the school....from my experience it is possible. Except the school I was going to allowed for you to go back and get a BA in the event that you had already gotten your BS or vice versa.
 
  • #13
cristo
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if this is really true then don't report the BA, only report the AA. make up some excuse about dropping out for family/health/money reasons. i can't see how they could possibly investigate further.

if you didn't get an AA from the institution you're about to get you're BA from go get one, you can still request it.
That's a fantastic idea: lie to your university. How does he explain the several years 'gap' that will be on his record?
 
  • #14
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If your interest in politics is being spurred by newpapers and elections, this is like someone deciding to move to physics after reading an elegant universe.
What is wrong someone getting interested in science after reading a book?
 
  • #15
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That's a fantastic idea: lie to your university. How does he explain the several years 'gap' that will be on his record?
umm i've already suggested how...?
 
  • #16
cristo
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umm i've already suggested how...?
But an associates degree is, what, two years and a bachelors is four years? So you're suggesting that he lost two years of his life due to health/family/money reasons? Doesn't sound plausible to me.
 
  • #17
j93
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But an associates degree is, what, two years and a bachelors is four years? So you're suggesting that he lost two years of his life due to health/family/money reasons? Doesn't sound plausible to me.
He could say he had cancer.
 
  • #18
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But an associates degree is, what, two years and a bachelors is four years? So you're suggesting that he lost two years of his life due to health/family/money reasons? Doesn't sound plausible to me.
what in the world are you talking about? who in their right mind would be suspicious of anything of an applicant who said they took time off, for any reason? you act like university wide admissions committees are akin to the cia.

He could say he had cancer.
or he could say nothing and if questioned could claim that it is a personal matter and he's not comfortable discussing it. and the admissions committee will/should respect his privacy.
 
  • #19
cristo
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what in the world are you talking about? who in their right mind would be suspicious of anything of an applicant who said they took time off, for any reason? you act like university wide admissions committees are akin to the cia.
Erm... if you have a gap on your CV, you need to have a reason to back this up, and explain what you were doing for those two years. If not, you just look like a bum.

or he could say nothing and if questioned could claim that it is a personal matter and he's not comfortable discussing it. and the admissions committee will/should respect his privacy.
Life doesn't work this this, I'm afraid. You can easily be asked questions like 'How did you support yourself during these two years? What did you do with your time?' If you just say "it's a personal matter" without any doctor's note, or evidence, then it'll just look like you sat around for two years doing nothing. Why would anyone want to take someone onto their course who dropped out of college the first time, and spent two years doing nothing in place of another student that does not have this on their record? It doesn't really bode well for their academic future, and doesn't show very good chances of obtaining a degree this time.

See.. it's really not beneficial to lie to people, especially not in this situation, since I think it'll reduce the chances of being accepted onto a degree program.
 
  • #20
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snip
this is to an undergrad degree program. no on cares that much. there are no interviews for undergrad programs here in the states. no one will question anything. he'll look like every other non-traditional student.
 
  • #21
cristo
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this is to an undergrad degree program. no on cares that much. there are no interviews for undergrad programs here in the states. no one will question anything. he'll look like every other non-traditional student.
So one can just stroll onto an undergraduate program without having their background looked into at all? I find that very hard to believe.

Anyway, to the OP, it is of course upto you to decide what you do, though I would not recommend lying in order to obtain admission onto a course. After all, if you do and get found out, you can very easily be kicked off.
 
  • #22
I can attest to how hard/easy it is to get into a program after an abnormal absence. It's tough.

I had a high school GPA and community college GPA of over 3.5 (out of 4, well over 3.5 in the case of the later) though and quite a few activities. I should have been a mostly scholarship student (a candidate for a competitive one at least). 80% of my coursework is paid for by loans. (which will be repaid quickly, hopefully.)

It's really not worth it to lie. If you lie, you have to lie to cover any questions about your lie. My best advice in this situation is to apply to graduate school in your field.

If your candidacy for a graduate program is too weak, fix it. (take classes, do research, take initiative in projects)

If you are not very good at what you want to do, fix that. (read books)

You will have a very tough time getting a second BA/BS you after graduation. You will get no financial aid (outside of private, high cost loans). You will be denied from most universities (if you are not good enough to get into graduate school, then they don't need you. Grad school students are generally 3.0+ gpas, so if you are sub 3.0 then you are likely more of a hindrance to that university).

If you are considering a change of major in your senior year, you might as well do it if you hate what you are doing. Find something you enjoy. If it's earlier than that, just do it.

edit: if you have to transfer, do it.
 

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