Understanding precipitation reactions

In summary: However, in particle growth, the particles continue to grow in size as more molecules attach to them. In summary, nucleation and particle growth are opposite processes. Nucleation favors supersaturated conditions, while particle growth requires a decrease in supersaturation to occur.
  • #1
ASidd
73
0
"When the precipitating agent is added to the solution it causes it to become supersaturated. This starts the process of nucleation where ions and molecules will clump together to form small particles. A small amount of nucleation is necessary to start precipitation. However as the reaction progresses we need particle growth to occur rather than nucleation. Particle growth results in the formation of large 3 dimensional crystals. It is an opposite process to nucleation which favors supersaturated conditions. Thus to increase particle growth we must decrease supersaturation"

The above paragraph is what I wrote for an assignment. Can somebody guide me as to whether it is correct or incorrect?
 
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  • #2
What exactly is you assignment? I honestly didn't understand why particle growth and nucleation are opposite processes and why it is that nucleation favors supersaturated conditions.
 
  • #3
Amok said:
What exactly is you assignment? I honestly didn't understand why particle growth and nucleation are opposite processes and why it is that nucleation favors supersaturated conditions.


Nucleation is when initial atoms and ions join together to make small molecules. Then further atoms and molecules attach to these molecules and then even more so the particle size is larger. If there are many nucleation sites then there are too many molecules for the particles to attach to; so they are spread out and particles aren't as large.
 

Related to Understanding precipitation reactions

1. What is a precipitation reaction?

A precipitation reaction is a type of chemical reaction in which two solutions, known as the reactants, combine to form an insoluble solid, known as the precipitate. This reaction occurs when the product of the reaction is less soluble in water than the reactants.

2. How does a precipitation reaction occur?

A precipitation reaction occurs when two aqueous solutions containing ions come into contact with each other. The positive and negative ions in the solutions may combine to form an insoluble compound, which then precipitates out of the solution.

3. What factors affect precipitation reactions?

The solubility of the reactants, temperature, and concentration of the solutions are all factors that can affect precipitation reactions. Additionally, the presence of other chemicals or ions in the solution can also impact the reaction.

4. How can you predict the products of a precipitation reaction?

To predict the products of a precipitation reaction, you can use a solubility table to determine which compounds are soluble and insoluble in water. The compounds that are insoluble will form the precipitate, while the soluble compounds will remain in solution.

5. What are some real-life applications of precipitation reactions?

Precipitation reactions have many real-life applications, including water treatment to remove pollutants, the production of medicines and cosmetics, and the creation of pigments for paints and dyes. They are also commonly used in the laboratory to separate and purify substances.

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