Uranium and supernovae explosions

In summary, heavy elements are thought to be formed in supernovae Explosions that result in the production of these elements are called core collapse supernovae.
  • #1
verdigris
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0
Do supernova explosions produce lumps of uranium or atoms of uranium?
 
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  • #2
It is conjectured that heavy elements are formed in supernovae.

These sites give background and overviews.

http://origins.colorado.edu/uvconf/white_final/node5.html

Stars of all masses spend the majority of their lives fusing hydrogen nuclei into helium nuclei: we call this stage the main sequence. When all of the hydrogen in the central regions of a star is converted into helium, the star will begin to "burn" helium into carbon. However, the helium in the stellar core will eventually run out as well; so in order to survive, a star must be hot enough to fuse progressively heavier elements, as the lighter ones become exhausted one by one. Stars heavier than about 5 times the mass of the Sun can do this with no problem: they burn hydrogen, and then helium, and then carbon, oxygen, silicon, and so on... until they attempt to fuse iron. . . .
The nuclear reactions do not produce enough energy to balance the force of gravity.
. . . . The lack of radiation pressure generated by the iron-fusing core causes the outer layers to fall towards the centre of the star. This implosion happens very, very quickly: it takes about 15 seconds to complete. During the collapse, the nuclei in the outer parts of the star are pushed very close together, so close that elements heavier than iron are formed.

What happens next depends on the mass of the star. Stars with masses between about 5 and 8 times the mass of our Sun form neutron stars during the implosion: the nuclei in the central regions are pushed close enough together to form a very dense neutron core. The outer layers bounce off this core, and a catastrophic explosion ensues: this is the visible part of the supernova.
from http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/supernovae.php

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/astro/snovcn.html
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/astro/nucsyn.html#c1


The Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae and the Ejection of Heavy Elements
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0212317

http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~pogge/Ast162/Unit3/supernova.html

http://zebu.uoregon.edu/disted/ph123/l10.html

http://universe.nasa.gov/press/2003/030918a.html

http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/iship2006/talks/thielemann_iship.pdf (presentation)
 
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  • #3
Thanks for the links.They collapse quickly don't they!
If the star didn't have a uniform mass distribution of iron,at the start,
would it collapse unevenly,and could this lead to an uneven pressure distribution that could cause the iron core to break up into pieces,stopping the usual kind of supernova explosion?
 
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What is uranium?

Uranium is a naturally occurring element with the atomic number 92 and the symbol U. It is a silvery-white metal that is slightly radioactive and is the heaviest naturally occurring element on Earth.

How is uranium used?

Uranium is primarily used as a fuel source for nuclear power plants. It is also used in the production of nuclear weapons, as well as in medical and industrial applications.

What is a supernova explosion?

A supernova explosion is a powerful and energetic event that occurs at the end of a massive star's life. It is the largest explosion that can happen in space, and it releases an enormous amount of energy and radiation.

How are uranium and supernovae explosions related?

Uranium is created through the process of supernova explosions. When a massive star reaches the end of its life, it explodes and releases elements, including uranium, into the universe.

Can uranium be found in supernova remnants?

Yes, uranium can be found in supernova remnants, which are the leftover debris from a supernova explosion. Scientists have detected uranium in the remnants of supernovae that have occurred in our galaxy.

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