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Using an integrating factor properly

  1. Feb 1, 2012 #1
    alright guys, I've been trying to tackle this for a couple of hours now.

    dy/dt-2y=4-t
    my integrating factor is e^(-2t) of course.

    dy(e^(-2t))/dt-2ye^(-2t)=4e^(-2t)-te^(-2t)

    then I get completely lost. how do I integrate when it's like this? My book simplifies the above equation into

    d(e^(-2y))/dt=4e^(-2t)-te^(-2t)

    can anyone explain how that simplification occurs??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 1, 2012 #2

    tiny-tim

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    hi cameuth! :smile:

    (try using the X2 button just above the Reply box :wink:)
    (you mean d(ye-2t)/dt :wink:)

    use the product rule on ye-2t :smile:
     
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