Using free fall acceleration to find another acceleration

  • Thread starter garcia1
  • Start date
  • #1
27
0

Homework Statement



A test of the prototype of a new automobile
shows that the minimum distance for a con-
trolled stop from 100 km/h to zero is 41 m.
Find the acceleration, assuming it to be
constant as a fraction of the free-fall accel-
eration. The acceleration due to gravity is
9.81 m/s2.
Answer in units of g.


Homework Equations



Kinematics equations


The Attempt at a Solution



I'm actually unsure how to even begin this problem. The statement has me confused, such as what they mean by "a fraction of the free-fall acceleration."
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ideasrule
Homework Helper
2,271
0
It means 9.8 m/s^2 would be 1g, 19.6 m/s^2 would be 2g, etc.

Do you know any kinematic equation that relates final speed, initial speed, acceleration, and distance?
 
  • #3
27
0
What I used with your advice was this equation:

v^2 = Vo^2 + 2ax -> a = v^2 - vo^2 / 2x -> 0 - (27.778 m/s^2) / 2(41m) = -9.4098

From here I did this equation as a fraction of the free fall acceleration:

-9.4098 m/s^2 / -9.80m/s^2 -> A = .9602g.

Whatever I might have done, I got the question wrong. Can you maybe help me elaborate on my errors?
 
  • #4
gneill
Mentor
20,925
2,867
Your methodology is okay. The resulting acceleration value, whether or not in units of g, should still be negative. You might also want to pay attention to the number of significant figures that are warranted.
 

Related Threads on Using free fall acceleration to find another acceleration

Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
19K
Top