Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey to find Planets

In summary, the conversation is about the speaker's search for images of Mars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey dataset. They are unsure if the survey keeps references to planets, and if it is possible to find images of Mars in the dataset. They also ask for suggestions for better sources if SDSS is not the best resource. They mention wanting low-resolution images and ask for recommendations on where else to look for such a dataset.
  • #1
daveed
138
0
I was wondering if anyone here had experience using the image dataset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Specifically, I want to find images of Mars from within their data. However, because they take one picture of the sky a night, and at a very small section of the sky, it's hard to predict where Mars would be. Does anyone know if they keep references to planets at all in their survey, how I might find images containing Mars, or if what I want to do is at all possible?

What I really want to have is several extremely low-resolution pictures of Mars. If the SDSS is not the best resource, does anyone have suggestions for better sources?

Thank you!
 
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  • #2
Wouldn't SDSS try to avoid Mars when making their images?
 
  • #3
That makes sense, I guess - they are taking rather long exposures, and Mars might just track across the image. In this case, does anyone have an idea of where I could look for such a dataset?
 

Related to Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey to find Planets

1. How does the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) help in finding planets?

The SDSS is a powerful telescope that captures high-quality images of the night sky. It has a dedicated planet-finding program that uses a technique called transit photometry to detect planets passing in front of their parent stars. This allows scientists to identify potential planets and further study them for confirmation.

2. What is transit photometry and how does it work?

Transit photometry is a method of planet detection that involves measuring the decrease in brightness of a star as a planet passes in front of it. The SDSS telescope captures images of thousands of stars, and by analyzing the changes in their brightness, scientists can identify potential planets.

3. What types of planets can be found using the SDSS?

The SDSS is primarily used to find large, gaseous planets known as "hot Jupiters" - planets that are similar in size to Jupiter but orbit extremely close to their parent stars. However, it is also capable of detecting smaller, rocky planets similar to Earth.

4. How accurate is the SDSS in finding planets?

The SDSS has a high success rate in finding planets, with over 2,000 confirmed detections to date. However, it is important to note that not all potential planets detected by the SDSS are confirmed, as further observations and data analysis are needed for confirmation.

5. Are there any limitations to using the SDSS for planet detection?

One limitation of the SDSS is that it can only detect planets that are aligned in such a way that they pass in front of their parent stars from Earth's perspective. Additionally, the SDSS is better suited for finding larger, gaseous planets rather than smaller, rocky ones. Other planet-finding techniques, such as radial velocity and gravitational microlensing, may be better suited for detecting certain types of planets.

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