UV lantern with zapper

  • Thread starter bluecap
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what kinds of flying insects can get attracted to the uv light in the lantern (sold everywhere) and get zapped? and whats the physics of how mosquitoes are attracted to them? is it because mosquitoes like the warm in the uv light and go there or their eye can see uv light and love to be in their company? is it really effective? if not.. having a uv lantern at the room all night can just cause violet hue all over the room and im concerned it may even harm the skin.. so it should only be used if it can really attract and kill mosquitoes... does it in your experience or based on your physics knowledge of the dynamics involved in mosquitoes being attracted to uv light? thanks!
 

jim mcnamara

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Your questions are all over the map.

I think two points will help.
#1:
Different bug species are attracted to different kinds of light sources, UV seems to attract the greatest percentage of them.
https://www.quora.com/Why-are-some-insects-attracted-to-light

Light has different names depending on frequency (wavelength). Starting from long wavelength to short, here are some names applied to the "kinds" of light:
Radio
Microwaves
Visible light (a very tiny part of the spectrum)
UV
X-rays
Gamma rays

#2
UV - Skin damage is determined by:
the intensity of the light,
the wavelength,
bare skin exposure time.

ILT's (insect light traps) have been tested for human damage potential. ILT's give off UV-A (UV-A: 315–400 nm (nm - nanometers - is a unit of length measurement for wavelegth)), and are used indoors in food processing plants. The exposure of UV-A over an 8 shift from these traps indoors is less than what you get from the sun during a short walk on a sunny day.

I think you can read this article:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4867860/

To be clear, you may be confusing this (UV-B) with light traps (UV-A):
BTW: UV-B ( not what an ILT makes) can damage skin but it also makes Vitamin D. And getting UV exposure outside as a Vitamin D source may not be a good choice for some people. An easy read:
http://www.skincancer.org/healthy-lifestyle/vitamin-d/make-vitamin-d-not-uv-a-priority

So. Not all UV light has a good or a bad effect on humans. It is complicated like most of life.

If you are afraid of UV light traps, do not use them.
 

Fervent Freyja

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It's the component that emits carbon dioxide that attracts them, not the light. The light does the killing.
 
396
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It's the component that emits carbon dioxide that attracts them, not the light. The light does the killing.
In a UV insect lantern. It is the electrified wires that electrocute the insects.. not the lamp. And the lantern doesn't emit carbon dioxide.. what product are you talking about?
 

Fervent Freyja

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In a UV insect lantern. It is the electrified wires that electrocute the insects.. not the lamp. And the lantern doesn't emit carbon dioxide.. what product are you talking about?
Don't worry about it. I'm not going to spend any more time replying to someone who attempted to twist my words when I tried to help them. Cheers.
 
396
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Don't worry about it. I'm not going to spend any more time replying to someone who attempted to twist my words when I tried to help them. Cheers.
Your exact statement was: "It's the component that emits carbon dioxide that attracts them, not the light. The light does the killing." You didn't quote what you were referring to so I'm assuming it's the uv lantern.. it doesn't emit carbon dioxide.. it is the light that attracts the insects and the electrified wires that destroy them.. so if anyone understands what Fervent was talking about.. please share.. thanks..
 

fresh_42

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Your exact statement was: "It's the component that emits carbon dioxide that attracts them, not the light. The light does the killing." You didn't quote what you were referring to so I'm assuming it's the uv lantern.. it doesn't emit carbon dioxide.. it is the light that attracts the insects and the electrified wires that destroy them.. so if anyone understands what Fervent was talking about.. please share.. thanks..
Mosquitoes are to my best knowledge primary attracted by the air we breathe out, that is by the higher ratio of ##CO_2.## You did not tell which product you are talking about, but complain if someone understands it as another product? So far you claimed that UV light attracts insects. Personally, I doubt this. IR radiation, maybe, but UV? Whether UV light kills insects or not is difficult to answer. I assume that the energies needed would harm other animals as well. @jim mcnamara has provided some useful articles in this context which you apparently preferred to ignore. In any case, the form of the discussion has become quite unfriendly, so I will close it if it remains that way.
 

berkeman

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Don't worry about it. I'm not going to spend any more time replying to someone who attempted to twist my words when I tried to help them. Cheers.
Thread closed for Moderation. I aven't been following this thread for a few days, so this seems strange on the face ov it. We are discussing the thread...
 

berkeman

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This is incorrect:
It's the component that emits carbon dioxide that attracts them, not the light. The light does the killing.
This is correct:
In a UV insect lantern. It is the electrified wires that electrocute the insects.. not the lamp. And the lantern doesn't emit carbon dioxide..
The thread will remain closed. Thank you all for the conversation. :smile:
 

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