Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Water found somewhere beyond Earth

  1. Mar 9, 2006 #1
    http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/03/09/cassini.enceladus/
    This probably one of the most important discoveries in space exploration.
    I wonder if there is other life within somewhere in our solar system.If there is then wouldn't be on the other inner planets.I wonder if it's possible that there could a moon orbiting a gas giant that we don't know about that has life on it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2006 #2
    It’s certainly a possibility, and that’s why scientists are itching to get space probes landing on these ice covered moons. Unfortunately discoveries of such kind, and our knowledge of the terrain of these worlds is being pushed back at least another decade, due to the cancellation of the Europa mission.

    Enceladus is a tiny planet, with a diameter of only 498 km, here's a picture comparing it to the UK.
     
  4. Mar 9, 2006 #3
    according to a video on the evolution of life on earth I have seen, planets need to be inside a special ring around their star that limits radiation, but still provides enough warmth to heat the planet. These same scientist also believe that the star needs to be of equivalent size to our sun, and the planet needs to be of equivalent size of the earth and Mars.

    So that means the Andorians don't exist!:cry:

    I personally believe that anything is possible, so Life on the moon could exist!
     
  5. Mar 10, 2006 #4
    The Bad Astronomer is reporting on a rumor spreading around the internet about a major NASA announcement later on today:

    While Keith at NASA Watch points out the irony of the situation in regards to a 50% cut in astrobiology:

     
  6. Mar 10, 2006 #5

    Phobos

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The best candidates for other places in our solar system with life are some of the large moons of Jupiter which are also suspected to have liquid water below their icy surface (and now I suppose we can add Saturn's moon Enceladus to the list). There's also still hope to find microbial life on Mars below the ground surface (although a slightly higher-probability hope is to find fossil microbes there). Other speculations are out there too...but liquid water seems to provide the best chance.
     
  7. Mar 10, 2006 #6
    That is what would be needed to have life on earth.Which is carbon-based.It could be possible that life could exist with alternative bio-chemistry and require differn't needs.
    I think life exist anywhere with the right chemical rections,there is evoltion.It is theortically "possible" that an ammonia-based life from exist on Jupiter(and highly100,000 unlikely).
    You might want to read this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraterrestrial_life
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrobiology
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_biochemistry
    http://egj.lib.uidaho.edu/egj22/miller1.html
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Water found somewhere beyond Earth
  1. BeYond that? (Replies: 5)

  2. Stars beyond earth (Replies: 13)

Loading...