Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Feild Inducer

  • Thread starter xieon
  • Start date
In summary: There must be some sort of barrier between the powder and the outside world. Maybe a thin layer of oil? We'll never know for sure as long as we're not in the powder itself. That being said, it's still an interesting concept and I recommend that you look more into it if you're interested.In summary, Lisa is trying to build a perpetual motion water wheel that will not work because the powder will not attract to itself.
  • #1
xieon
8
0
http://i14.tinypic.com/40c0dty.jpg

The link above, and the attached file are simple diagrams of what I plan to do.

Key:
1)Magnetic Reservoir
2)Dam
3)Turbine
4)Metal Ring (non Iron)
5)Magnetic Reservoir 2
6)Pump
7)Hose
8)Load

First let me explain what the magnetic reservoir is. A large amount of a high power permanent magnet (neodymium for example) will be ground down into as fine of a powder as possible. The powder will then be added to the two reservoirs.

The damn will then be opened at the top, causing the water from the top to flow through the dam and move the turbine (The spinning turbine will create power for a load, EX: a light).

Then the water will pass through the loop, the loop will create a current, which will be sent to the pump.

The pump will then pump the water, which magnet dust, through the hose and back to the first reservoir. The water falling into the two reservoirs will cause the magnets to be stirred about and not clog the pump/dam.

The process can also be switched so that the magnets power a small light, and the turbine is able to power a pump.


Any input?
 

Attachments

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  • #2
The turbine will not produce enough power to drive the pump. You must understand that the amount of energy taken from the turbine depends on the height of the water, so to optomize the turbine, it needs to be all the way at the bottom of the system. At the same time, to get the most out of the loop, you need the water to be falling as fast as possible, so it also needs to be at the bottom of the system. You can move the two up and down 'till your heart's content, trading energy back and forth between them, but the total energy provided by the combination of the two, ignoring efficiency losses, will always be the same and will always equal the potential energy of the top reservoir. Toss in some efficiency losses, and you'll never get what you need to drive the pump.

"Lisa, in this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!"
-Homer

People have been trying to build perpetual motion water wheels for a milenia and they always fail. I recommend you stop wasting your time with it and learn some thermodynamics instead. Either way, we'll help you understand why it won't work, but we won't entertain crackpottery here - so be aware that this thread will have a short leash.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
What will prevent the magnetic poweder from attracting to itself?
 
  • #4
Well a group of us was working on this in my class, and amazingly no one realized that the powder would just stick to itself as the above post said.
 

1. What is a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer?

A Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer is a type of turbine that harnesses the energy of falling water to generate electricity. It includes a set of magnets that create a magnetic field, which is then used to induce a current in the rotating turbine blades. This technology is often used in hydroelectric power plants.

2. How does a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer work?

The Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer works by using the kinetic energy of falling water to rotate the turbine blades. As the blades spin, they pass through the magnetic field created by the magnets, which induces a current in the blades. This current is then converted into electricity and sent to power grids for use.

3. What are the advantages of using a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer?

There are several advantages to using a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer. It is a renewable energy source that does not produce harmful emissions, making it environmentally friendly. It also has a long lifespan and requires minimal maintenance, making it a cost-effective option for producing electricity.

4. What are the disadvantages of a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer?

One major disadvantage of a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer is its dependence on a suitable location with a steady source of falling water. This means it may not be feasible to install in all areas. Additionally, the initial cost of building a hydroelectric power plant can be expensive, and the construction process can also have negative impacts on the surrounding ecosystem.

5. How does a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer compare to other renewable energy sources?

Compared to other renewable energy sources, a Waterfall Turbine/Magnetic Field Inducer has a higher efficiency in converting the energy of falling water into electricity. It also has a lower carbon footprint compared to fossil fuels. However, its reliance on a suitable location and potential environmental impacts must also be considered when comparing it to other renewable energy sources such as solar or wind power.

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