Weak Interactive Force: Mesons & Bosons

In summary, the weak interactive force acts on leptons, quarks, and particles built out of quarks such as hadrons. It also mediates the W and Z bosons. Additionally, it couples to photons and gravity, but not gluons. The charged weak current interaction only affects left-handed chirality eigenstates, while the neutral weak current interaction affects both chirality eigenstates with varying strength depending on the particle.
  • #1
Xtreme
2
0
What exactly does the weak interactive force act on?
Does it act on Mesons and Bosons?
 
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  • #2
It acts on leptons (electron, muon, tau, and neutrinos) and quarks, and therefore on all particles built out of quarks (hadrons, which includes baryons and mesons). And the W and Z bosons which themselves mediate the weak interaction.

To put it another way, everything except photons, gluons and (if they exist) gravitons.
 
  • #3
jtbell said:
To put it another way, everything except photons, gluons and (if they exist) gravitons.

It couples to photons and gravity as well. So everything except gluons.
 
  • #4
One should also point out that the charged weak current interaction (W-boson) just couples to particles in the left-handed chirality eigenstate whereas the neutral weak current interaction (Z-boson) couples to both chirality eigenstates but in general with different strength, depending on the particle.
 

Related to Weak Interactive Force: Mesons & Bosons

1. What is the weak interactive force?

The weak interactive force is one of the four fundamental forces in nature, along with gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong nuclear force. It is responsible for interactions between particles that involve the exchange of W and Z bosons.

2. What are mesons and bosons?

Mesons are subatomic particles made up of a quark and an antiquark, bound together by the strong nuclear force. They are unstable and decay into other particles quickly. Bosons, on the other hand, are particles that carry fundamental forces. The W and Z bosons are responsible for the weak force.

3. How does the weak force differ from other fundamental forces?

The weak force is the only fundamental force that can change one type of particle into another. This process, called particle decay, is responsible for radioactive decay and plays a crucial role in the stability of atoms and the universe.

4. What are the implications of the weak force for particle physics?

The weak force plays a crucial role in the standard model of particle physics, which describes the interactions between all known particles. It also helps explain the origin of mass and the asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the universe.

5. How is the weak force studied and observed?

The weak force is studied and observed through particle accelerators, where high-energy collisions between particles can produce W and Z bosons. These collisions can help scientists understand the properties and behavior of these particles and their interactions with other particles.

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