Weight change in rotating space station

In summary, the problem involves finding the period of rotation for a station with a radius of 25m and an angular velocity of w in order to produce an apparent gravity of 0.7g. The period is calculated to be 12s. The next question asks for the apparent weight of an astronaut weighing 75Kg and running at 5m/s in the direction of rotation. The attempt at a solution involves finding the Coriolis acceleration and dividing it by the centrifugal force to get a ratio of 0.763. This suggests that the weight increases by 76%, resulting in an apparent weight of 907.98N. However, after consulting some sources, it is determined that the correct way to calculate the
  • #1
indie452
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0

Homework Statement



station has radius 25m and rotate with w.
we were asked to find the period of rotation required to produce apparent gravity 0.7g i worked this out to be 11.99s = 12s. using a(0.7g) = v^2 /r

we are then asked if astronaut weighs 75Kg and runs at 5m/s in the direction of rotation what is his apparent weight?

The Attempt at a Solution



I know the weight will increase but I am not sure by how much

i tried finding the coriolis acc. = 2wv' v' is velocity in rotating frame
this is relative to the centrifugal force (which in this case is 0.7g) so i divided by this amount and got:

2*2pi/12*5 = 5.24m/s/s
5.24/0.7g = 0.763

i was wondering if this means that the weight increases by 76% so it changes from:
before = 75*0.7g = 515.025N
after = 907.98N

i thought this might be too much but then again he is running at 5m/s
is this right?
 
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  • #2
ok I've looked through some of y books and found that it says that for a guy standing in a spinning wheel the apparent weight i m*w^2*r and so i thought that i could just change w to be w[o]+w[5] where w[0] is him still and w[5] is him running at 5m/s

so apparent weight = 75*(0.524 + 0.2)^2*25 = 982.83N

2pi/12=0.524

is this right? cause it seems ore logical
 
  • #3



I would say that your reasoning and calculations are correct. The weight of the astronaut will indeed increase by approximately 76% due to the combination of apparent gravity and the Coriolis acceleration caused by the rotation of the space station. This is a well-known phenomenon known as the "Coriolis effect" and is often taken into account in designing space stations and other rotating structures. It is important to note that this increase in weight is only apparent and is not due to a change in the astronaut's mass.
 

Related to Weight change in rotating space station

1. How does gravity affect weight change in a rotating space station?

In a rotating space station, the centrifugal force created by the rotation can counteract the gravitational force and cause a feeling of weightlessness. This effect is similar to what astronauts experience in space.

2. Can weight change in a rotating space station affect the human body?

Yes, the constant change in gravitational force can have an impact on the human body, including changes in blood pressure and fluid distribution. However, the effects can be mitigated with regular exercise and proper nutrition.

3. Is it possible to control weight change in a rotating space station?

Yes, the rotation speed and radius of the space station can be adjusted to control the strength of the centrifugal force and thus the weight change experienced by individuals inside.

4. How does weight change in a rotating space station compare to weight change on Earth?

The weight change experienced in a rotating space station is dependent on the rotation speed and radius, but it can range from feeling weightless to feeling a higher gravitational force than on Earth. It is not a constant value like on Earth.

5. Can weight change in a rotating space station affect experiments and research conducted in space?

Yes, the varying gravitational force can affect the results of experiments and research conducted in a rotating space station. To minimize this effect, space stations can have designated areas with a constant gravitational force for conducting experiments.

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