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I Artificial gravity in a rotating space station

  1. Oct 11, 2018 at 7:18 PM #1
    It is often proposed that gravity could be simulated on a space station by rotating around an axis, such that the astronaut experiences the centripetal force of the space station wall, analogously to gravity. It is usually mentioned that the radius of rotation must be very large to avoid significant Coriolis effect being experienced by the astronaut. My question is this:

    Could Coriolis effects be cancelled by some weird tumbling or precessing program of spin? I imagine this could be accomplished with a constant expenditure of thrust, but what about something inertial, even if it required gyroscopes or whatever?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 11, 2018 at 10:35 PM #2

    A.T.

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  4. Oct 12, 2018 at 4:20 AM #3

    sophiecentaur

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    Wow, what a strange environment you are suggesting. Actually, the occupants would be far more likely to learn to cope with a very predictable effect like a moderate Coriolis, once they get their sea / space legs. When they return to Earth they are just as likely to fall over without the effect - 'the sways' is a common experience that people get when they return from a few days at sea and stand in their kitchen whilst washing dishes etc..
    And I agree with @A.T. of course!
     
  5. Oct 12, 2018 at 6:25 AM #4

    anorlunda

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  6. Oct 12, 2018 at 1:48 PM #5
    You can study this yourself by riding the Gravitron. Just sit up and move your head around.
    upload_2018-10-12_13-42-4.png

    And Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitron. I know for a fact that Coriolis effects forced me to lay down on the grass for an hour after one ride, while my then 12 year old daughter rode it continuously for hours. Google motion sickness centrifuge for lots of good information.
     
  7. Oct 12, 2018 at 5:42 PM #6

    sophiecentaur

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    I can feel quite nauseous enough after a few rotations of the little roundabout in my granddaughter's local kiddies' playground. I think it's the mucus in my 'tubes'. I definitely no longer have the 'right stuff'. Also, when tacking on my sailboat, Coriolis used to spoil my sense of direction as I tried to change sides in the cockpit and found I was moving diagonally.
     
  8. Oct 13, 2018 at 8:19 AM #7
    My ability to work with vectors is poor I'll admit, but the simple answer seems to be no, right? It is not possible to make Ac zero by changing the angular velocity over time. And would this take into account the possibility of rotation around a separate axis, such as spinning around the radius of the primary rotation? I suppose such an additional rotation would introduce an additional Coriolis acceleration...
     
  9. Oct 13, 2018 at 8:24 AM #8
    The Gravitron is a fixture from my county fair childhood- just the thought experiment of moving around in there makes me queasy. I never had the right stuff. I remember hurling from it, though thankfully not inside the gravitron itself- my lunch came up on the cool down lap on the pirate ship!
     
  10. Oct 13, 2018 at 1:29 PM #9

    A.T.

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    You still get one net Ω.
     
  11. Oct 13, 2018 at 4:27 PM #10
    That's the fundamental insight I was missing. I can see why it is the case. Thanks!
     
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