What Are the Quantum Mechanics of a Particle in a 1-D Box?

  • Thread starter swain1
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation discusses a particle moving in a 1-D box with a potential that is zero in the region and infinite at the walls and elsewhere. It covers the possible results and relative probabilities of measuring the energy of the system, the possible forms of the wave function after the measurement, and the relative probabilities of the possible outcomes if the energy is immediately re-measured. The individual asking for help has the wavefunction at a particular time and the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunction, but is struggling with figuring out the next steps. They mention attempting to find the overlap integral of the wavefunction and eigenfunction, but are having difficulties. Another individual asks for help as well, stating they are also having trouble getting started and would appreciate any
  • #1
swain1
30
0
A particle moving in a 1-D box subject to a potential that is zero in the region and infinite at the walls and elsewhere.

(a) Determine the possible results of the measurement of the energy of this system and their relative probabilities. (b) What are the possible forms of the wave function immediately after such a measurement? (c) If the energy is immediately re-measured, what now will be the relative probabilities of the possible outcomes?

For this question I have the wavefunction at a paticular time and also the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunction. I understand the maths involved but I am struggling with working out what I have to do. I would be grateful of any help. Thanks
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
well if you have the energy eigenvalues, you are done with part a, if you have the wavefunction you are done with part b, so it seems like you are well on your way. Part c wants you to realize that in quantum mechanics, a measurement collapses the wave function, google "quantum mechanics wavefunction collapse".
 
  • #3
swain1 said:
A particle moving in a 1-D box subject to a potential that is zero in the region and infinite at the walls and elsewhere.

(a) Determine the possible results of the measurement of the energy of this system and their relative probabilities. (b) What are the possible forms of the wave function immediately after such a measurement? (c) If the energy is immediately re-measured, what now will be the relative probabilities of the possible outcomes?

For this question I have the wavefunction at a paticular time and also the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunction. I understand the maths involved but I am struggling with working out what I have to do. I would be grateful of any help. Thanks
So what did you get so far ? Formula's please...Starting from those, we can help you on your way.

Regards
marlon
 
  • #4
Thats really the problem I have is getting started. What I have tried is to work out the overlap integral of my wavefunction and the eigenfunction but I just have a horrible integration that I can't do and I don't know if I am going about it in the right way?
 
  • #5
im trying to do that same exercise, but i don't know how to start, I am really having trouble with this one, could anyone give me a hand?
 

1. What is the main topic of discussion in Rae Chapter 4?

The main topic of discussion in Rae Chapter 4 is the concept of questioning and its importance in the scientific process.

2. How does the author define a "good" question?

The author defines a "good" question as one that is open-ended, specific, and can be tested or explored through scientific methods.

3. Why is it important for scientists to constantly ask questions?

Asking questions allows scientists to continually gather new information, challenge existing beliefs, and make new discoveries.

4. What are some common barriers to asking good questions?

Some common barriers to asking good questions include fear of being wrong, lack of curiosity, and being too focused on finding specific answers.

5. How does the author suggest overcoming these barriers?

The author suggests overcoming these barriers by cultivating a curious mindset, being open to new ideas, and thinking critically about the information presented.

Similar threads

  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
832
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
190
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
746
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
1K
Back
Top