Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What do you call this homomorphism?

  1. Oct 15, 2008 #1

    tgt

    User Avatar

    f:A->A but f(a) does not equal a for all a in A.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 15, 2008 #2
    Endomorphism?
     
  4. Oct 15, 2008 #3
    If set of all homomorphism is denoted as U,
    and identity mapping is denoted as I

    That is complementary set of identity map.
    denoted as U-I
     
  5. Oct 16, 2008 #4

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    So you have a "set of homomorphisms" minus a single homomorphism? U- {I} would make more sense. But I would interpret "does not equal a for all a in A" as meaning f(a) is NEVER equal to a.
     
  6. Oct 16, 2008 #5
    I am confused, too.
    A group homomorphism always
    maps 1 to 1, so...
     
  7. Oct 17, 2008 #6

    tgt

    User Avatar

    fair point. It's probably an endomorphism.
     
  8. Oct 17, 2008 #7

    tgt

    User Avatar

    that seems right.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: What do you call this homomorphism?
  1. What do you think? (Replies: 2)

  2. What is this called? (Replies: 1)

Loading...