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What equations should I know about Classical Physics?

  1. Apr 20, 2013 #1
    Two object are thrown at the same time from a surface wich has an angle of θ. The first pbject is thrown paralel with the surface, with the speed v1. The second object is thrown horizontally with the speed of v2. The objects hit each other at a certain point. What is the distance between the point they were thrown and hit eachother? (The gravitational acceleration is g)

    The question is translated. It may not be clear ask anything you didn't understand verbally.

    The thing I want to know is, what equations should I know to solve this by myself?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 20, 2013 #2

    CWatters

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    If you can ignore air resistance then the SUVAT equations here should be all you need..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equations_of_motion

    Is there a diagram to go with the question?

    If you throw an object "from a surface" but also "paralel with the surface" it seems it must remain in contact with the surface. So it follows a straight line.
     
  4. Apr 20, 2013 #3
    Yes, the first object keeps the contact with the ground
     
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