What geometry theorem is used in this figure?

  • B
  • Thread starter barryj
  • Start date
  • #36
FactChecker
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
7,590
3,314
You had best get another calculator.
My calculator is fine. If that was a right angle, the length of ##x## would be 12.8062484748657.
(And the angle would not be bisected to give a partitioning of 4 and 6. Although, I didn't calculate what they should be.)
 
  • #37
berkeman
Mentor
64,140
15,353
Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...
 
  • #38
berkeman
Mentor
64,140
15,353
After some thread cleanup, the thread will remain closed. Thank you everybody for helping the OP with his question.
 
  • #39
barryj
850
50
[Mentor Note -- OP has requested that this clarification post be added to the end of this closed thread]

The moderator closed part 1 before I could post the requested theorem. I have attached the figure and a copy of the theorem from a geometry book for those that are interested.
 

Attachments

  • img261.jpg
    img261.jpg
    20.9 KB · Views: 17
  • img262.jpg
    img262.jpg
    52.4 KB · Views: 15
Last edited by a moderator:

Suggested for: What geometry theorem is used in this figure?

Replies
18
Views
425
  • Last Post
Replies
23
Views
855
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
353
Replies
15
Views
853
  • Last Post
2
Replies
53
Views
3K
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
318
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
477
Replies
13
Views
488
Replies
8
Views
1K
Top