What geometry theorem is used in this figure?

In summary, the conversation revolves around determining a geometry theorem that can be used to state that 8/4 = x/6 and whether or not the given triangle is a right triangle. It is concluded that the triangle is not a right triangle and the theorem in question is the triangle angle bisector theorem. The conversation also includes discussion on the importance of clear and accurate drawings in geometry problems.
  • #36
barryj said:
You had best get another calculator.
My calculator is fine. If that was a right angle, the length of ##x## would be 12.8062484748657.
(And the angle would not be bisected to give a partitioning of 4 and 6. Although, I didn't calculate what they should be.)
 
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  • #37
Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...
 
  • #38
After some thread cleanup, the thread will remain closed. Thank you everybody for helping the OP with his question.
 
  • #39
[Mentor Note -- OP has requested that this clarification post be added to the end of this closed thread]

The moderator closed part 1 before I could post the requested theorem. I have attached the figure and a copy of the theorem from a geometry book for those that are interested.
 

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