1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What if a major isn't offered at a particular college?

  1. Oct 15, 2008 #1
    I'm torn between aerospace engineering and physics at the moment but I'm beginning to lean towards aerospace engineering. Now I'm seriously looking at University of Kentucky but they don't specifically offer it as a major but I've seen it grouped under mechanical engineering at other colleges. What exactly does this mean? Is it truly aerospace engineering? Should I look at another college just because of this? Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 15, 2008 #2
    Mechanical and Aerospace are 2 classes apart where I went for undergrad.
     
  4. Oct 15, 2008 #3
    At my school there is a 6 class difference. I'm doing a double major in Mechanical/Aerospace, and it's basically adding 1 extra semester. If you want aerospace, you need classes like propulsion, aircraft design, flight dynamics, etc.

    On UK's website, they have an aerospace certificate program that seems to include these classes.
    http://www.engr.uky.edu/pdf_docs/me/AerospaceCertificate.pdf
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2008
  5. Oct 15, 2008 #4
    Thanks for the website but I think that is for grad students. Under their Departments list, aerospace engineering isn't listed at all.
     
  6. Oct 16, 2008 #5

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2015 Award

    This may sound obvious, but if you want to major in Aerospace Engineering, you should attend a college that has a degree in Aerospace Engineering.
     
  7. Oct 16, 2008 #6
    So if I do a physics major, could I potentially work on spacecraft once I have a degree? My main problem with a physics major is that I really don't want to sit around at a desk all day and crunch numbers. I'd actually like to do something with it.
     
  8. Oct 16, 2008 #7
    If you plan on going to grad school, you could always get your BS in Physics and MS in Aerospace Engineering. This is a better bet ( short of getting a PhD ) for getting a job in the aerospace industry rather than just a BS.
     
  9. Oct 17, 2008 #8

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2015 Award

    Sure. But be aware that having a newly minted BS degree probably means you will have very little discretion in what you work on day to day. You'll be doing what people with more education, experience or both tell you to do. That may mean sitting at your desk and calculating.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: What if a major isn't offered at a particular college?
Loading...