What is Chromoelectric dipole moment?

In summary, the conversation discusses Chromoelectric dipole moment (CEDM) and its relation to electric dipole moment (EDM). CEDM is generated from the color field, while EDM is generated from the electric field. For spin-1/2 particles, the effective lagrangian density for EDM is defined by its interaction with an electric field, while for quarks, it is defined by its interaction with strong interactions. Both EDMs and CEDMs can result in violations of P, T, and CP symmetries.
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Sehwook Lee
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Basically, I wonder what Chromoelectric dipole moment is and how it is formed...
 
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It is exactly the same thing as an electric dipole moment, but it's generated from color field. Therefore you must be careful about non-commutativity of the charges
 
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The Electric Dipole Moment [itex]\vec{d}_f[/itex] of some particle [itex]f[/itex], is defined by its interaction with an electric field [itex]\vec{E}[/itex]:

[itex] H_{EDM} = - \vec{d}_f \cdot \vec{E}[/itex]

For a spin-1/2 particle, this corresponds to the effective lagrangian density:

[itex] \mathcal{L}_{EDM} = \frac{-i}{2} d_f F_{\mu \nu} \bar{\psi}_f \sigma^{\mu \nu} \gamma^5 \psi_f [/itex]

you can have a similar term if you look at quarks [itex]\mathcal{q}_r[/itex], by replacing the electromagnetism with strong ints:

[itex] \mathcal{L}_{CEDM} = \frac{-i}{2} d_r^{CEDM} G_{\mu \nu}^a \bar{\mathcal{q}}_r \sigma^{\mu \nu} \gamma^5 \frac{\lambda^a}{2} \mathcal{q}_r [/itex]

and that's how it arises... In general both EDMs and CEDMs generate P and T (so CP) violations.
 
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1. What is a chromoelectric dipole moment?

A chromoelectric dipole moment (CEDM) is a measure of the separation of positive and negative chromoelectric charge within a particle or system of particles. It is a property that arises in certain theories beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.

2. How is a chromoelectric dipole moment different from an electric dipole moment?

A chromoelectric dipole moment is similar to an electric dipole moment, but it involves the strong nuclear force rather than the electromagnetic force. It is also a higher-order effect in particle physics, meaning that it is typically much smaller than an electric dipole moment.

3. Why is the chromoelectric dipole moment important in particle physics?

The chromoelectric dipole moment is important because it can provide insight into the structure and behavior of subatomic particles. It is also a sensitive test of theories beyond the Standard Model, as any non-zero value would indicate the presence of new physics.

4. How is the chromoelectric dipole moment measured?

The chromoelectric dipole moment is typically measured in high-energy particle colliders, where the strong force can be studied in detail. Scientists look for deviations from the Standard Model predictions in the behavior of particles, which could indicate the presence of a CEDM.

5. What are the implications of a non-zero chromoelectric dipole moment?

If a non-zero chromoelectric dipole moment is discovered, it would be a groundbreaking discovery in particle physics. It would indicate the presence of new interactions and particles beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, potentially leading to a deeper understanding of the fundamental laws of the universe.

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