What is conceptual physics?

  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I have been wondering, what is conceptual physics?

I remember taking a class in high school that was physics oriented, for example two trains leave a station at different speeds, and arrive at a central point, where do they overlap. Also there were trig functions on how to find the height of a flag pole.

Is this the physics I remember taking or is it something else. I would also like to learn about the concepts of projectile motion. I have recently discovered via my software development skills that I can up and down grade measurements based on a certain algorithm which I pass the number of bytes to it. It takes into account the correct way to display the number value. I was thinking this upgrade and downgrade functionality could be used in physics equations to remove some of the boiler plate from those equations.
 

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  • #2
berkeman
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I have been wondering, what is conceptual physics?

I remember taking a class in high school that was physics oriented, for example two trains leave a station at different speeds, and arrive at a central point, where do they overlap. Also there were trig functions on how to find the height of a flag pole.

Is this the physics I remember taking or is it something else. I would also like to learn about the concepts of projectile motion. I have recently discovered via my software development skills that I can up and down grade measurements based on a certain algorithm which I pass the number of bytes to it. It takes into account the correct way to display the number value. I was thinking this upgrade and downgrade functionality could be used in physics equations to remove some of the boiler plate from those equations.
Your thread may be moved to a more appropriate forum from the General Physics forum, since your question is not technical in nature.

Maybe check out this small fun book:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias=stripbooks&field-keywords=thinking+physics

51YBVGVV19L._SX313_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 

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  • #3
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Actually If the equations I remember doing in high school are in fact the ones outlined I will buy a much more expensive book. I have a lot of hobbies right now, and I am getting some new Ideas of what I could possibly be doing with my tremendous free time. I remember velocity equations, and other such things.
 
  • #4
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I remember taking a class in high school that was physics oriented, for example two trains leave a station at different speeds, and arrive at a central point, where do they overlap. Also there were trig functions on how to find the height of a flag pole.
Sounds more like an algebra class, or in the case of find the height of a flagpole, and algebra/trig class.

Is this the physics I remember taking or is it something else. I would also like to learn about the concepts of projectile motion.
Projectile motion is often one of the first topics presented in a physics class.

I have recently discovered via my software development skills that I can up and down grade measurements based on a certain algorithm which I pass the number of bytes to it. It takes into account the correct way to display the number value. I was thinking this upgrade and downgrade functionality could be used in physics equations to remove some of the boiler plate from those equations.
I have no idea what you're talking about here, with upgrading or downgrading measurements. My best guess is that you're asking about how many significant figures you should include in a calculation, based on the precision of the measurements you're working with. If that's not what you're asking, I don't have a clue, otherwise.

What "boiler plate" in physics equations do you mean? And what algorithm are you talking about that involves the number of bytes (of what?)? You've pretty well lost me with what you're asking in the 3rd paragraph.
 
  • #5
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Sorry I should have stated better, I can convert measurements Megabyte, Kilobyte, and Gigabyte, etc between their additive forms and their preferred display values, which I can't remember right now but is typically a number less than 10 in it's respective categorization. Since I have code for computer sizes, other metrics should be easy.
 
  • #6
33,265
4,965
Sorry I should have stated better, I can convert measurements Megabyte, Kilobyte, and Gigabyte, etc between their additive forms and their preferred display values, which I can't remember right now but is typically a number less than 10 in it's respective categorization. Since I have code for computer sizes, other metrics should be easy.
additive forms - ???
preferred display values - ???
I don't know what you mean by these terms.
cnblock said:
typically a number less than 10 in it's respective categorization.
Are you asking about scientific notation? For example, 273 would be written in scientific notation as ##2.73 \times 10^2##.

cnblock said:
Since I have code for computer sizes, other metrics should be easy.
No idea what you're trying to say here.
 
  • #7
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Megabytes, Kilobytes, Gigabytes is to centimeters, Meters, and Kilometers
As both are related to the nebulous concept of a Measurement System. You are being too picky.
You have probably learned that in your equations you are supposed to convert to a universal measurement type before you solve, and then convert to the measurement type that best fits the answer.
 
  • #8
33,265
4,965
Megabytes, Kilobytes, Gigabytes is to centimeters, Meters, and Kilometers
As both are related to the nebulous concept of a Measurement System.
Nebulous? It's nothing more than understanding what the prefixes mean.
Mega - ##10^6##
Kilo - ##10^3##
Giga - ##10^9##
deci - ##10^{-1}##
centi - ##10^{-2}##

You are being too picky.
No, I'm just trying to decipher what you're talking about, most of which is very unclear.

You have probably learned that in your equations you are supposed to convert to a universal measurement type before you solve, and then convert to the measurement type that best fits the answer.
No, before you write the equation, you need to make sure that the units are consistent. For example, if some measurements are in inches and others are in meters, you need to convert one of them so both are in the same units.
If you "convert to the measurement type that best fits the answer," that assumes that you already know the answer and are reverse-engineering your work to agree with it.
 

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