How to study for Electromagnetism or something else in high school level?

  • #1
Priyo137
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5
I have been taught topics in high school circling around Newtonian mechanics and some basics of work and energy, waves, geometric optics, current and circuits and some poor electrostatics and unclear concepts of modern physics.

I realize that I have significant weak areas in Physics and I aim to self study (only as a passion, I think). I think I should move to Electromagnetism or something else. I have learnt quite mathematics (from algebra topics to calculus, matrix, coordinate geometry and complex numbers etc.).

Whenever I've tried to learn new topics other than mechanics problems like electrostatics, I find hardly any beginner level problems to practice (they seem much hard and take hours to find an answer).

I think there should be a solution to (1) the choice of topics to learn an overview of Physics and (2) the way to find good problems to start with in those topics.
 
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  • #2
Priyo137 said:
I realize that I have significant weak areas in Physics and I aim to self study (only as a passion, I think). I think I should move to Electromagnetism or something else.
One of the keys for me in self-studying topics is to be able to do experiments and build things to help drive home the theoretical lessons. It is especially helpful if the things you build as part of this learning are actually useful to you in your life.

What kinds of interests do you have where you could do experiments and build things while you are learning about aspects of EM where you can use the final product of those experiments and projects? For example, a friend of mine built an AM/FM radio from scratch starting with just transistors while he was in high school. It was pretty impressive, and I'm sure he learned a lot while learning about radio theory, circuit theory, etc. as part of that project. Do you have an interest in learning analog and digital circuit theory and maybe building a few projects?

What about antenna theory and amateur radio? The EM behind antenna design and operation is pretty interesting, and building and evaluating your own antennas can be fun.

Do you have a Science Club or similar at your high school? If so, what kinds of topics do they cover in their meetings and projects? Do you have a Science Fair at your school or nearby that you can participate in? Do you see any opportunities for a Science Fair project where you could do some learning about an area of EM and apply that to the project?

Do you have an Electronics Lab at your high school or a local Community College where you could use their instruments while you work on your own circuit projects? It is helpful to have things like a power supply, a signal generator and an oscilloscope when building your own electronics projects.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antenna_(radio)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diode
 
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Since you say you know calculus, and are in the us. Then cc in majority of states offer free classes, or close to nothing, for high school students.

So you can technically enroll into physics courses and or join physics/engineering club.
 
  • #5
MidgetDwarf said:
Since you say you know calculus, and are in the us.
Their Profile/About page says they are in Bangladesh... :smile:
 
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