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B What is containing the Universe?

  1. Nov 1, 2018 #1
    Hey i was here for my airsoft problemes but while im waiting...
    What is containing the universe? is nothingness somehting? Or is it simply infinite?how is there an infinity of things? and if life is just a chemical raction from matter how with a spark it suddenly has will, would it mean matter has a less noticeable intelligence?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 1, 2018 #2

    A.T.

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    The universe is per definition all there is.
     
  4. Nov 1, 2018 #3
    Ok thanks so its going forever and ever there is no limit? And when the explosion of the big bang happenned where did it happen? In some place that is also part of the universe?
     
  5. Nov 1, 2018 #4

    russ_watters

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    The name and popular description give the wrong idea. It wasn't like an explosion that happened at a particular place and expanded from there. Sing the universe is all there is, its start had to happen everywhere. Unfortunately this is difficult to visualize without analogies, such as an expanding load of rasin bread or the surface of an expanding balloon. But these of course have limitations.
     
  6. Nov 1, 2018 #5
    Ok i picture it better now.thanks. Still hard to imagine it expend into nothing.like the ballon needs space to expend into no? .Would be easier to understand if it was like : "at the moment of the big bang everything was together and then everything started to shrink very fast".but still, that everything is contained by something otherwise even if expending or shrinking things would still be glue together no?
     
  7. Nov 1, 2018 #6

    jbriggs444

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    'taint necessarily so.
     
  8. Nov 1, 2018 #7

    russ_watters

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    That's the limitation of the analogy. The balloon analogy works fine mathematically, but when we picture it in our minds its expanding into already existing space, and that's not how it works.
     
  9. Nov 1, 2018 #8

    A.T.

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    Not if the thing is everything per definition.
     
  10. Nov 1, 2018 #9
    Without straying towards the philosophical, yes life is just a certain chemistry, biochemistry. The biochemistry in bacteria is different to what goes on in mammalian life. Also the lines are blurred when you bring viruses into the picture. Are they alive or not?There is no ''spark' that has any scientific meaning. By definition 'matter' does not in itself have intelligence. Brains give rise to intelligence and the animal kingdom has a very large range of them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 1, 2018
  11. Nov 1, 2018 #10
    Ok So the universe can create as much space as he wants without "expanding" since its infinite?

    Wasnt it a first form of life and from there it evolved into everything we know? , isnt the thing that made the first brain kinda intelligent? I was picturing Frankenstein^^ its dead and after the lightning strikes.. its alive. Or is the matter already alive but we dont notice it because it dosnt move or evolve?
     
  12. Nov 1, 2018 #11

    jbriggs444

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    That is not how it works. Even a finite, closed universe can expand without expanding into anything.
     
  13. Nov 1, 2018 #12
    By shrinking everything?
     
  14. Nov 1, 2018 #13
    I guess as Russ said its impossible to picture it without some advance knowledge?
    because im really strugling
     
  15. Nov 1, 2018 #14
    I could be wrong, but I doubt that anyone really understands these things in the way the OP would like to understand them.
     
  16. Nov 1, 2018 #15

    russ_watters

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    What you can picture is a universe of fewer dimensions, but you have to force yourself to only consider the analogy within its constraints.

    In the balloon analogy, the only thing in the analogy is the surface of the balloon. It's a 2d representation of 3d space. You have to ignore the space inside and around the balloon: they do not exist.

    The surface of a balloon is finite in surface area, but has no boundaries: no edges (and therefore no center). When it expands, it just expands. There is nothing overtaken, it just creates new area in the old area.

    The universe is rather like that, but in 3d instead of 2d.
     
  17. Nov 1, 2018 #16
    So it is creating new space by shrinking everything down? Or is he pulling out new space out of his hat? It really burns me to think that you can add space without either making the whole thing grow or the things we use to observe expension, shrink.
     
  18. Nov 1, 2018 #17
    Also how could something finite be everything there is? I mean dosnt finite means it stops somewhere? How can you know for sure there is nothing outside or inside the balloon?
     
  19. Nov 1, 2018 #18
    How has it no edges if its finite? Like if you add new stuff in a video game even tho it has no boundries no center when you are inside it, the volume of the game will be bigger on your computer. so in some way it is expanding into something no? And my character cant jump out of the screen because there is no screen for him and he will have absolutely no way to find out there is some other place outside his universe. His unique chance might be to realise that if everything there is is finite then it must be contained by something else?
     
  20. Nov 1, 2018 #19

    Hugh de Launay

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    I think the answer has to be philosophical whenever you talk about the boundary conditions set at the edge of our universe. No one has been there to affirm or deny what is beyond our universe. There could well be an infinite number of other universes like ours. You can call this the ultra-universe. It is a matter of probability: what is the most likely scenario?
     
  21. Nov 1, 2018 #20

    jbriggs444

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    Because "finite" does not mean having edges. Take the surface of a balloon, for instance. It has no edges. But it you cannot walk infinitely far on the surface without coming back to where you started.

    If you've ever played a video game where when you walk off the right side of the screen you come in the left (a toroidal topology), that is a finite playing surface with no edges.
     
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