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What is that indicator/math symbol?

  1. Aug 11, 2017 #1
    Some sort of hazziness inside a circle ..name of that??
     

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  3. Aug 11, 2017 #2

    Drakkith

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  4. Aug 11, 2017 #3

    fresh_42

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    And it's only made to let English native speakers look bad, as it is no "th" but originally pronounced as "teta", and of course with an "eh", not an "e". :-p
     
  5. Aug 11, 2017 #4

    Drakkith

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    Err, what?
     
  6. Aug 11, 2017 #5

    George Jones

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    It is an uppercase theta; you are probably mores used to seeing a lowercase theta.
     
  7. Aug 11, 2017 #6

    fresh_42

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    Ancient Greek: θῆτα thē̂ta [tʰɛ̂ːta]
     
  8. Aug 11, 2017 #7

    Drakkith

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    Oh, you're just saying it was originally pronounced differently than we do now.
     
  9. Aug 11, 2017 #8

    TeethWhitener

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    The Greek-Americans that I asked pronounce it "thita," rhyming with "pita" but enunciating the t.
     
  10. Aug 11, 2017 #9
    Isberg and Resnick really confuses me He could use beta,gamma or anything, instead of this uppercase theta
     
  11. Aug 11, 2017 #10

    mfb

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    As this is in the context of radioactivity, alpha beta or gamma would be a problematic choice, and you probably want to keep delta for delta-electrons as well. ##\theta## for angles is quite common,no idea why that text uses ##\Theta##.
     
  12. Aug 11, 2017 #11

    fresh_42

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    Yes, but whether one pronounces it in modern Greek, with an "[ i ]" or in ancient Greek with an "[ e ]", the "th" is wrong, as it is the Greek version of a "t" which is pronounced as a "t". Perhaps I should start and say the Steelers are from Pittsborough ...
    Edit: I might have been wrong here, as the Greek have a sound [##t^h##] which is closer to "th" than to "t", something as in "theft". I had forgotten that there is also the ##\tau## for "t".
    Yes, but modern Greek is a bit different from the ancient language.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  13. Aug 11, 2017 #12

    fresh_42

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    We usually loot every alphabet we can get a hand on ##a,b,c,\ldots , \alpha,\beta,\gamma,\ldots , \mathfrak{a},\mathfrak{g},\mathfrak{h},\ldots, \mathbb{C},\mathbb{F},\mathbb{N},\ldots ,\mathcal{A},\mathcal{B},\mathcal{C},\ldots , \mathscr{A},\mathscr{B},\mathscr{C}##
    that it makes me wonder why we don't use и , я , ч , etc.
     
  14. Aug 11, 2017 #13

    mfb

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  15. Aug 15, 2017 #14

    Mark44

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    Don't forget the Hebrew letter aleph (##\aleph##), as in ##\aleph_0, \aleph_1## and so on.
     
  16. Aug 17, 2017 at 4:00 PM #15
    Arabic has some interesting letters. Too many important symbols have a wide variety of meanings
     
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