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What is the physical significance of having +/- a constant multiplying

  1. Apr 1, 2013 #1
    After normalising a wave equation, lets say psi = A*e^(-r/a), and finding that A = +/- sqrt(2/a), what does this mean in terms of the physical significance of the wave?

    Would the wave just be a superposition of two waves with the two different A values?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 1, 2013 #2

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    You can multiply any wave function by a constant factor of the form ##e^{i\theta}## without any physical effect. For example, the probability density gets multiplied by ##e^{i\theta}e^{-i\theta} = 1## which of course has no effect.

    As a special case of the above, if you let ##\theta = \pi##, the constant factor becomes ##e^{-i\pi} = -1##.
     
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