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What is the term for phobia of becoming mother?

  1. Jul 15, 2010 #1
    What is the term for phobia of becoming mother? Please let me know.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 16, 2010 #2

    Char. Limit

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    Well, there's tokophobia for childbirth, but I don't think there's an official name for a fear of becoming a mother. Parentophobia is the best I can come up with, and it's pseudo-Greek at best, just plain wrong at worst.
     
  4. Jul 16, 2010 #3

    Danger

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    I can think only of the German term: "dambrokinrubber" syndrome.
     
  5. Jul 16, 2010 #4
    :rofl:

    I found several for fear of childbirth: lockiophobia, maieusiophobia or parturiphobia. But nothing for fear of being a mom.
     
  6. Jul 16, 2010 #5

    Pythagorean

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    First, are you planning on using this information to guilt your wife into having a baby?
     
  7. Jul 16, 2010 #6
    I have a nameless fear.
     
  8. Jul 16, 2010 #7

    Danger

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    :rofl:

    Humor aside (ahem...)
    Are you referring to a real phobia or just the normal human reaction toward caring for something helpless? The latter is perfectly normal, and particularly for males. I'm not particularly innocuous, as is indicated by my name, but I felt... The first time that slept with a pregnant woman, and the first time that I held a little baby, were the same. I was afraid to move in case I broke something.
    I've always wanted a child, but it's pretty much out of the question now. All of my girlfriends were either on birth control or naturally infertile, including W who had a diaphram and was menopausal (not to mention having already sparked off 6 offspring). I still want one, but there is no practicality to that desire. No woman that I consider a suitable mate would have anything to do with me, and even if she did I wouldn't be alive at the end of gestation. That sort of defeats the purpose, since the biological side is simply an ingrained urge and my desire is to raise someone in my mindset (with normal variations, of course).
    At the back of my mind has also been that thought that, evolutionary pelvic structure notwithstanding, asking a woman to go through childbirth would be like me being asked to fire a 3 kg bowling ball out of my ***.
     
  9. Jul 16, 2010 #8
    So you don't fear becoming a mother?
     
  10. Jul 16, 2010 #9
    Thanks a lot, everyone, for your suggestions. I find many of them close to what I'm looking for.

    Hi Pyth

    I'm a single!

    I'm also an English learner as I'm sure you have already figured out. 'guilt' is a noun, therefore its use, "to guilt", in my humble and personal opinion, is incorrect. Please let me know if I'm wrong. Please don't mind anything.:smile:
     
  11. Jul 16, 2010 #10

    Danger

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    Your opinion is correct. Python was using a common slang term which means to make one feel guilty about something.
     
  12. Jul 16, 2010 #11
    You are correct that the grammar is incorrect. However, this is the net where grammatical errors are usually ignored. As a result, you should always assume that the grammar you read on the net might not be correct.
     
  13. Jul 16, 2010 #12
    The real.

    See if you were a woman, you would have that phobia of becoming a mother!

    Best wishes
    Jack
     
  14. Jul 16, 2010 #13
    Phobias about potential motherness aside, verbifying nouns is positively de rigueur these days with English. First case up: Google.

    *curtsy*

    Disclaimer: Most examples of verbifying bug the ever-living-beejeebeez out of me.
     
  15. Jul 16, 2010 #14

    Office_Shredder

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    Obviously not too much
     
  16. Jul 16, 2010 #15

    Danger

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    :rofl:
     
  17. Jul 16, 2010 #16

    drizzle

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    When my mother was pregnant with my brother, she took my hand and put it on her tummy, it was okay until he kicked/ turned/ whatever he did... I was speechless… TERRIFIED! kind of like this cat's reaction:

    [PLAIN]http://icanhascheezburger.files.wordpress.com/2008/09/funny-pictures-evil-genius-cat-is-excited-about-his-creation.jpg [Broken]

    I said to her “how do sleep at night with this… Alien in your tummy?”


    Irony is, he's my favorite brother now.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  18. Jul 16, 2010 #17
    I didn't know that you could feel the movement of an unborn baby by placing a hand on the tummy. Probably, he just knew that it was his brother so he was a bit...excited, happy and turned a little bit around!
     
  19. Jul 16, 2010 #18

    lisab

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    Sister :biggrin:.

    Oh yes, you can definitely feel it moving from the outside. Sort of like a squirmy cat in a pillow case. But for a truly freaky feeling, you have to be on the other side...the mom!
     
  20. Jul 16, 2010 #19

    Evo

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    It's common to see the baby kicking or pushing. You could clearly see the foot of my daughter pushing against my stomach. The baby of a girl at work was kicking so hard that it was making her blouse jump with each kick.

    Surely there are women that are phobic about becoming a mother, I was nearly phobic in my fear of going into labor, and I definitely did not ever want to be a mother. Is it because it's not "right" to not want to be a mother?
     
  21. Jul 16, 2010 #20
    I remember seeing and feeling the kicks of my children from within the womb. That was the first communication I had with them when I kicked them back.
     
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