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What physics and math needed to start some research in astronomy

  1. Mar 18, 2013 #1
    Alright well I am in high school so my resources are limited as far as sophisticated telescope. Although I can ask around via email to see if there is any way to find time on more sophisticated technology. As far as what levels of math and physics I am at next fall I will be taking fundamentals of physics with calculus 1/2, for math calculus 2 and calculus 3 and possibly astronomy 1/2. I can study on my own as well I have a text on astronomy. I know of a few good texts on astrophysics, high energy astrophysics and osculations and waves. What I mainly want to know is what are the levels of each that I will need. Which math books which physics and astronomy books etc. Also my preferred area would be cosmological or high energy areas such as GRBs. I do understand that this is all a far shot and I should wait until college, but I just want to get an idea of what is needed. There is also a science fair that I would like to enter two years from now that I would like to start on.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 18, 2013 #2
    Also does anyone know of what computer languages I should learn for simulations. I've read python and FORTRAN are ok. Does anyone know of a good way to learn the basics in these.
     
  4. Mar 18, 2013 #3
    google "Thinking like a computer scientist python". It's a great read.
     
  5. Mar 18, 2013 #4
    Which site there was several sites? Or is it the purple book with a bird?
     
  6. Mar 18, 2013 #5
    yeah the purple book with the bird. You can download a free PDF from the website (fully legit). Python is a great language to learn programming and it's used all over the place.
     
  7. Mar 18, 2013 #6
    Sweet thank you. Do you know of any good compilers for python?
     
  8. Mar 18, 2013 #7
  9. Mar 18, 2013 #8
    That's awesome. Thank you again.
     
  10. Mar 18, 2013 #9

    turbo

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    You can do all kinds of research/analysis using NASA's databases. There are images, spectroscopic analyses, and other goodies hidden there. You don't need your own telescope - we have our own, and they are pretty good ones.
     
  11. Mar 18, 2013 #10
    Really! Well that's perfect. Is it just raw data or is it from peoples research?
    And do you know of what level of math and physics is needed to use this data for actual astronomical research?
     
  12. Mar 18, 2013 #11

    turbo

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    You don't need a lot. What you will need is the time to mine the data and put it together in a form that allows it to be used. If you can get a lot of data into a tabular format, there is a lot that you can do with it, even with only basic math/dB tools.
     
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